A Physician Testifies About the Crucifixion

Discussion in 'Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality' started by Blake Bowden, May 26, 2012.

  1. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    About a decade ago, reading Jim Bishop's The Day Christ Died, I realized that I had for years taken the Crucifixion more or less for granted -- that I had grown callous to its horror by a too easy familiarity with the grim details and a too distant friendship with our Lord. It finally occurred to me that, though a physician, I didn't even know the actual immediate cause of death. The Gospel writers don't help us much on this point, because crucifixion and scourging were so common during their lifetime that they apparently considered a detailed description unnecessary. So we have only the concise words of the Evangelists: "Pilate, having scourged Jesus, delivered Him to them to be crucified -- and they crucified Him."

    I have no competence to discuss the infinite psychic and spiritual suffering of the Incarnate God atoning for the sins of fallen man. But it seemed to me that as a physician I might pursue the physiological and anatomical aspects of our Lord's passonate some detail. What did the body of Jesus of Nazareth actually endure during those hours of torture?

    This led me first to a study of the practice of crucifixion itself; that is, torture and execution by fixation to a cross. I am indebted to many who have studied this subject in the past, and especially to a contemporary colleague, Dr. Pierre Barbet, a French surgeon who has done exhaustive historical and experimental research and has written extensively on the subject.

    Apparently, the first known practice of crucifixion was by the Persians. Alexander and his generals brought it back to the Mediterranean world -- to Egypt and to Carthage. The Romans apparently learned the practice from the Carthaginians and (as with almost everything the Romans did) rapidly developed a very high degree of efficiency and skill at it. A number of Roman authors (Livy, Cicer, Tacitus) comment on crucifixion, and several innovations, modifications, and variations are described in the ancient literature.

    For instance, the upright portion of the cross (or stipes) could have the cross-arm (or patibulum) attached two or three feet below its top in what we commonly think of as the Latin cross. The most common form used in our Lord's day, however, was the Tau cross, shaped like our T. In this cross the patibulum was placed in a notch at the top of the stipes. There is archeological evidence that it was on this type of cross that Jesus was crucified.

    Without any historical or biblical proof, Medieval and Renaissance painters have given us our picture of Christ carrying the entire cross. But the upright post, or stipes, was generally fixed permanently in the ground at the site of execution and the condemned man was forced to carry the patibulum, weighing about 110 pounds, from the prison to the place of execution.

    Many of the painters and most of the sculptors of crucifixion, also show the nails through the palms. Historical Roman accounts and experimental work have established that the nails were driven between the small bones of the wrists (radial and ulna) and not through the palms. Nails driven through the palms will strip out between the fingers when made to support the weight of the human body. The misconception may have come about through a misunderstanding of Jesus' words to Thomas, "Observe my hands." Anatomists, both modern and ancient, have always considered the wrist as part of the hand.

    A titulus, or small sign, stating the victim's crime was usually placed on a staff, carried at the front of the procession from the prison, and later nailed to the cross so that it extended above the head. This sign with its staff nailed to the top of the cross would have given it somewhat the characteristic form of the Latin cross.

    But, of course, the physical passion of the Christ began in Gethsemane. Of the many aspects of this initial suffering, the one of greatest physiological interest is the bloody sweat. It is interesting that St. Luke, the physician, is the only one to mention this. He says, "And being in Agony, He prayed the longer. And His sweat became as drops of blood, trickling down upon the ground."

    Every ruse (trick) imaginable has been used by modern scholars to explain away this description, apparently under the mistaken impression that this just doesn't happen. A great deal of effort could have been saved had the doubters consulted the medical literature. Though very rare, the phenomenon of Hematidrosis, or bloody sweat, is well documented. Under great emotional stress of the kind our Lord suffered, tiny capillaries in the sweat glands can break, thus mixing blood with sweat. This process might well have produced marked weakness and possible shock.

    After the arrest in the middle of the night, Jesus was next brought before the Sanhedrin and Caiphus, the High Priest; it is here that the first physical trauma was inflicted. A soldier struck Jesus across the face for remaining silent when questioned by Caiphus. The palace guards then blind-folded Him and mockingly taunted Him to identify them as they each passed by, spat upon Him, and struck Him in the face.

    In the early morning, battered and bruised, dehydrated, and exhausted from a sleepless night, Jesus is taken across the Praetorium of the Fortress Antonia, the seat of government of the Procurator of Judea, Pontius Pilate. You are, of course, familiar with Pilate's action in attempting to pass responsibility to Herod Antipas, the Tetrarch of Judea. Jesus apparently suffered no physical mistreatment at the hands of Herod and was returned to Pilate. It was in response to the cries of the mob, that Pilate ordered Bar-Abbas released and condemned Jesus to scourging and crucifixion.

    There is much disagreement among authorities about the unusual scourging as a prelude to crucifixion. Most Roman writers from this period do not associate the two. Many scholars believe that Pilate originally ordered Jesus scourged as his full punishment and that the death sentence by crucifixion came only in response to the taunt by the mob that the Procurator was not properly defending Caesar against this pretender who allegedly claimed to be the King of the Jews.

    Preparations for the scourging were carried out when the Prisoner was stripped of His clothing and His hands tied to a post above His head. It is doubtful the Romans would have made any attempt to follow the Jewish law in this matter, but the Jews had an ancient law prohibiting more than forty lashes.

    The Roman legionnaire steps forward with the flagrum (or flagellum) in his hand. This is a short whip consisting of several heavy, leather thongs with two small balls of lead attached near the ends of each. The heavy whip is brought down with full force again and again across Jesus' shoulders, back, and legs. At first the thongs cut through the skin only. Then, as the blows continue, they cut deeper into the subcutaneous tissues, producing first an oozing of blood from the capillaries and veins of the skin, and finally spurting arterial bleeding from vessels in the underlying muscles.

    The small balls of lead first produce large, deep bruises which are broken open by subsequent blows. Finally the skin of the back is hanging in long ribbons and the entire area is an unrecognizable mass of torn, bleeding tissue. When it is determined by the centurion in charge that the prisoner is near death, the beating is finally stopped.

    The half-fainting Jesus is then untied and allowed to slump to the stone pavement, wet with His own blood. The Roman soldiers see a great joke in this provincial Jew claiming to be king. They throw a robe across His shoulders and place a stick in His hand for a scepter. They still need a crown to make their travesty complete. Flexible branches covered with long thorns (commonly used in bundles for firewood) are plaited into the shape of a crown and this is pressed into His scalp. Again there is copious bleeding, the scalp being one of the most vascular areas of the body.

    After mocking Him and striking Him across the face, the soldiers take the stick from His hand and strike Him across the head, driving the thorns deeper into His scalp. Finally, they tire of their sadistic sport and the robe is torn from His back. Already having adhered to the clots of blood and serum in the wounds, its removal causes excruciating pain just as in the careless removal of a surgical bandage, and almost as though He were again being whipped the wounds once more begin to bleed.

    In deference to Jewish custom, the Romans return His garments. The heavy patibulum of the cross is tied across His shoulders, and the procession of the condemned Christ, two thieves, and the execution detail of Roman soldiers headed by a centurion begins its slow journey along the Via Dolorosa. In spite of His efforts to walk erect, the weight of the heavy wooden beam, together with the shock produced by copious blood loss, is too much. He stumbles and falls. The rough wood of the beam gouges into the lacerated skin and muscles of the shoulders. He tries to rise, but human muscles have been pushed beyond their endurance.

    The centurion, anxious to get on with the crucifixion, selects a stalwart North African onlooker, Simon of Cyrene, to carry the cross. Jesus follows, still bleeding and sweating the cold, clammy sweat of shock, until the 650 yard journey from the fortress Antonia to Golgotha is finally completed.

    Jesus is offered wine mixed with myrrh, a mild analgesic mixture. He refuses to drink. Simon is ordered to place the patibulum on the ground and Jesus quickly thrown backward with His shoulders against the wood. The legionnaire feels for the depression at the front of the wrist. He drives a heavy, square, wrought-iron nail through the wrist and deep into the wood. Quickly, he moves to the other side and repeats the action being careful not to pull the arms to tightly, but to allow some flexion and movement. The patibulum is then lifted in place at the top of the stipes and the titulus reading "Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews" is nailed in place.

    The left foot is now pressed backward against the right foot, and with both feet extended, toes down, a nail is driven through the arch of each, leaving the knees moderately flexed. The Victim is now crucified. As He slowly sags down with more weight on the nails in the wrists excruciating pain shoots along the fingers and up the arms to explode in the brain -- the nails in the writs are putting pressure on the median nerves. As He pushes Himself upward to avoid this stretching torment, He places His full weight on the nail through His feet. Again there is the searing agony of the nail tearing through the nerves between the metatarsal bones of the feet.

    At this point, as the arms fatigue, great waves of cramps sweep over the muscles, knotting them in deep, relentless, throbbing pain. With these cramps comes the inability to push Himself upward. Hanging by his arms, the pectoral muscles are paralyzed and the intercostal muscles are unable to act. Air can be drawn into the lungs, but cannot be exhaled. Jesus fights to raise Himself in order to get even one short breath. Finally, carbon dioxide builds up in the lungs and in the blood stream and the cramps partially subside. Spasmodically, he is able to push Himself upward to exhale and bring in the life-giving oxygen. It was undoubtedly during these periods that He uttered the seven short sentences recorded:

    The first, looking down at the Roman soldiers throwing dice for His seamless garment, "Father, forgive them for they know not what they do."

    The second, to the penitent thief, "Today thou shalt be with me in Paradise."

    The third, looking down at the terrified, grief-stricken adolescent John -- the beloved Apostle -- he said, "Behold thy mother." Then, looking to His mother Mary, "Woman behold thy son."

    The fourth cry is from the beginning of the 22nd Psalm, "My God, my God, why has thou forsaken me?"

    Hours of limitless pain, cycles of twisting, joint-rending cramps, intermittent partial asphyxiation, searing pain where tissue is torn from His lacerated back as He moves up and down against the rough timber. Then another agony begins...A terrible crushing pain deep in the chest as the pericardium slowly fills with serum and begins to compress the heart.

    One remembers again the 22nd Psalm, the 14th verse: "I am poured out like water, and all my bones are out of joint; my heart is like wax; it is melted in the midst of my bowels."

    It is now almost over. The loss of tissue fluids has reached a critical level; the compressed heart is struggling to pump heavy, thick, sluggish blood into the tissue; the tortured lungs are making a frantic effort to gasp in small gulps of air. The markedly dehydrated tissues send their flood of stimuli to the brain.

    Jesus gasps His fifth cry, "I thirst."

    One remembers another verse from the prophetic 22nd Psalm: "My strength is dried up like a potsherd; and my tongue cleaveth to my jaws; and thou has brought me into the dust of death."

    A sponge soaked in posca, the cheap, sour wine which is the staple drink of the Roman legionaries, is lifted to His lips. He apparently doesn't take any of the liquid. The body of Jesus is now in extremes, and He can feel the chill of death creeping through His tissues. This realization brings out His sixth words, possibly little more than a tortured whisper, "It is finished."

    His mission of atonement has completed. Finally He can allow his body to die.

    With one last surge of strength, he once again presses His torn feet against the nail, straightens His legs, takes a deeper breath, and utters His seventh and last cry, "Father! Into thy hands I commit my spirit."

    The rest you know. In order that the Sabbath not be profaned, the Jews asked that the condemned men be dispatched and removed from the crosses. The common method of ending a crucifixion was by crurifracture, the breaking of the bones of the legs. This prevented the victim from pushing himself upward; thus the tension could not be relieved from the muscles of the chest and rapid suffocation occurred. The legs of the two thieves were broken, but when the soldiers came to Jesus they saw that this was unnecessary.

    Apparently to make doubly sure of death, the legionnaire drove his lance through the fifth interspace between the ribs, upward through the pericardium and into the heart. The 34th verse of the 19th chapter of the Gospel according to St. John reports: "And immediately there came out blood and water." That is, there was an escape of water fluid from the sac surrounding the heart, giving postmortem evidence that Our Lord died not the usual crucifixion death by suffocation, but of heart failure (a broken heart) due to shock and constriction of the heart by fluid in the pericardium.

    Thus we have had our glimpse -- including the medical evidence -- of that epitome of evil which man has exhibited toward Man and toward God. It has been a terrible sight, and more than enough to leave us despondent and depressed. How grateful we can be that we have the great sequel in the infinite mercy of God toward man -- at once the miracle of the atonement (at one ment) and the expectation of the triumphant Easter morning.

    Dr. C. Truman Davis is a nationally respected Opthalmologist, vice president of the American Association of Ophthalmology, and an active figure in the Christian schools movement. He is founder and president of the excellent Trinity Christian School in Mesa Arizona, and a trustee of Grove City College.

    Source: Dr. C. Truman Davis

    [video=youtube;e1e7uvKcrzY]http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=e1e7uvKcrzY#![/video]
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2012
  2. Cigarzan

    Cigarzan Premium Member

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    For Christ’s love compels us, because we are convinced that one died for all, and therefore all died. And he died for all, that those who live should no longer live for themselves but for him who died for them and was raised again. II Cor. 5:14-15
     
  3. towerbuilder7

    towerbuilder7 Moderator Premium Member

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    It is THIS very story which should remind us ALL of the trivial things about which we complain on a daily basis, and the sacrifice Jesus The Christ made for US; he absolved us of all of our sins BEFORE WE WERE EVEN BORN!! We are constantly reminded that GOD "does not sleep nor slumber", so why should WE LOSE SLEEP worrying about our burdens??? GOD wants us to give ALL of our burdens to HIM, and rejoice that he will deliver on his PROMISE. We remain faithful until earthly death, and we shall receive EVERLASTING LIFE. Our mind and our soul lives forever, even as our physical being is laid to rest.........this "immortality of the soul" is one of the central beliefs of a Master Mason/Scientist, who lives his life investigating the mysteries of our Progressive Science.................Bro. Vincent C. Jones, Sr., Bayou City Lodge #228, PHA, F&AM, Houston, Texas
     
  4. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    I still don't get this Western fetishization of the suffering. Ultimately, the suffering is not that important. The suffering did not save us. The Resurrection saved us. Any man can suffer and die. Only God can raise Himself from the dead, trampling down death by death and granting life to those in the tombs. Before anyone brings it up, my Church has addressed the modernist innovation of the "substitutionary atonement": Saint Athanasius and the.
     
  5. towerbuilder7

    towerbuilder7 Moderator Premium Member

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    I respectfully disagree Brother..........The sacrifice itself WAS significant. Jesus sacrificed himself, so that Levite Priests would no longer have to utilize the Day of Atonement to sacrifice animals one day a year. The Day of Atonement was a Jewish Custom, and the Israelites believed that their GOD would come into the Sanctum Sanctorum and speak to ONLY the Levite Priest..........Jesus's sacrifice was believed to REPLACE the yearly animal sacrifice, and also allows US to speak directly to GOD through Jesus............the sacrifice AND the resurrection are BOTH significant. I dont consider my belief in what is documented in Masonry to be a "Western Fetish"..........just my two cents........................Bro. Jones
     
  6. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    The sacrifice certainly had significance, but it was not the end-all and be-all event. It was more prelude than climax, but very many people make it the climax, and the Resurrection is given the attention of an epilogue. The fetishization is the idea that the suffering, somehow, is the most important part of Christ's Salvific act.
     
  7. cog41

    cog41 Premium Member

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    Nice post.

    I agree the Resurrection is the culmination of Christ work on earth, but He first must die the sacrificial death.

    "And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without the shedding of blood is there no remission." Hebrews 9:22

    Nice responses all.

    An interesting thread indeed.
     
  8. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    However, the "sacrificial death" is a prologue, a preliminary, not the main work. But the West makes death the main work and Resurrection a mere footnote.
     
  9. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    You have an excellent point Bro. Maloney and MANY share your viewpoints on my youtube channel comments. Between the timing of the song(s) and lack of real video in the movie, I opted to leave the actual resurrection out. I plan on re-editing it HD in the near future and will make every attempt to "work in" the final scene. That being said, the video post was just an afterthought. I found the article, just from a physical perspective intriguing, which is why I posted it. Great feedback everyone!
     
  10. towerbuilder7

    towerbuilder7 Moderator Premium Member

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    I can see Bryan's point, and agree with his premise that not enough emphasis is placed on the Resurrection in SOME Churches. Here's my take on things Brothers......Religion was made by MAN----GOD isn't concerned with your Religion.

    Some Churches actually SELL different interpretations of what THEY think are important to THEIR flock in order to attract members, I.E., the "name it and claim it" gospel, "call it and haul it" gospel----the "GOD wants everybody to be prosperous" prosperity teaching. GOD's selfishness as it deals with Man revolves around our RELATIONSHIP, not our Religion or Church.

    I Agree with Bryan and I place a heavy emphasis on BOTH Jesus's sacrifice as well as his resurrection as i pray daily. Bro Jones
     
  11. timgould

    timgould Registered User

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    This is an interesting topic. Good Friday is good Friday, but Easter will always be about the resurrection. My opinon on why there has been so much talk on the act of the cross is to show the extreme torment that Christ suffered, voluntarily for you specifically. We have all grown up seeing the wooden Jesus on the cross, and, perhaps as a child it looked harsh to our new eyes. But as time goes on, and our eyes see even more gruesome sights on TV, the cross seems stale in comparison. I believe the bringing of these details to light, through this MD, and movies like that made by Mel Gibson, brings to light and memory exactly what our God was willing to put himself through, for you.

    It is the eye popping part of the story. The resurrection is the Paul Harvey part of the story.

    And... bottom line... if knowing these facts, or seeing those movies, bring one person to Christ saving power... Praise God! It was worth it. For in the end, that is all of our purpose on earth. To make God known and reachable to mankind through Jesus our Christ.
     
  12. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    So what about "extreme torment"? So what? Big deal. That's a fetish for the spiritual children of Rome to follow, it seems. What I care about is the Resurrection. I don't get why the lurid fetishization is so popular in Western Christianity. Among Orthodox Christians, it's prelude, it's preliminary. The salvation begins at the Resurrection.
     
  13. timgould

    timgould Registered User

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    I am not clear if your stance is purely Orthodox or not. It may well be. If it is, I find it ironic that the Orthodox churches for the most part continie to show Jesus on the cross, being it is no "big deal" and the Western Protestant Chruches show the cross empty (after the crucifixion).
     
  14. jvarnell

    jvarnell Premium Member

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    I am not a catholic but I don't see why you are calling this a fetish it is a part of the explanation in places in Hebrews of the old teastament. There are a spesfic set of events that show up in the old teastament that were followed. I have not looked at the Orthodox christian to see why they believe what they believe. This is why everyone beleives in deferent ways but calling it a fetish was odd to me it is there beleif but I hope people read the old teastament to see why.
     
  15. jvarnell

    jvarnell Premium Member

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    One more thing as I was just looking at the orthodox christian and some thing jumped out at me was an inspired work for them is the book of Enoch. The Catholics because of the council of nicea don't have it in there cannon and they may say that is wrong and I will defend the Orthodox christians.
     
  16. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    First, the Council of Nicea took place LONG before the Roman Catholics split away from the Church. Please cite references to prove otherwise. Second, the Book of Enoch is considered "readable" but not worthy of inclusion in Scripture, much like a lot of modern theological writings that you probably read, yourself.
     
  17. CajunTinMan

    CajunTinMan Registered User

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    It is important to remember the suffering that out Lord was willing to endure for us. How can people be callus to His suffering for us and just thankful for what they got out of it?
     
  18. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    It is far more important to remember the RESURRECTION He accomplished for us! We all suffer. We all can suffer. The suffering was but prelude--unless you believe in an evil, sadistic, bloodthirsty "god" who requires pain to satiate his vile appetite for vengeance. The value of Christ's suffering, if it had any, is that He assumed full humanity, and thus suffered as we suffer. At any time He could have called it off or simply not felt it, but He remained one of us while simultaneously remaining God. But the suffering is still not the point. The suffering is given far too much importance as some kind of payment of pain given to an evil, bloodthirsty entity that demands sadistic satisfaction. Emphasizing the suffering reduces God to nothing but a human tyrant, with the desires and lusts of a human tyrant.
     
  19. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    We show both Him on the Cross and the Cross empty. A representation of the Crucifixion is behind the Altar because the Liturgy always includes a return to the Last Supper and the events of Good Friday, followed by a return to the Resurrection. We do not emphasize the suffering and death to the point where the Resurrection becomes a footnote or an afterthought. For us, the crucifixion is the prelude, not the climax. The Resurrection is the climax, not an epilogue.
     
  20. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    While I agree on your historical points on christianity, and there is much more than just the council of Nicea that defined christianity, but I think it's offensive to say that it's a fetish. My personal belief is that Christianity likes to undermine its different sects, even though the speak the same book and scripture. How can a religion claim salvation when itself is divided?
     

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