Army/Navy JAG

Discussion in 'Freemasons in the Military' started by Norski_406, Sep 20, 2017.

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  1. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    I am currently in law school. The other day an Army JAG came to the law building and held a meeting with some general information as to what the Army JAG does and what they have to offer. The next day, a Navy JAG came and hosted a similar meeting. What the JAG has to offer comes off as incredibly enticing. I'm further inclined to apply out of a desire to serve my country to the best of my ability. As of now, I am particularly interested in the Navy JAG.

    I'm hoping someone on MyFreemasonry might be able to lend me some further insight as to what being in the JAG Corps is really like. What did you like about it? What did you not like about it? What do you wish you would have known when you joined?
     
  2. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    We have at least one Army recruiter here but not sure what he focuses on. Enlisted or officer...not sure.
     
  3. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Retired Navy Jag. All services have excellent training. If you get into military justice, you will quickly have high level , serious court room experience. You will be head and shoulders above your civilian contemporaries in rules of evidence.

    Now, what gave you the impression Navy was better than Army? I mean, it is , I’m just wondering why you think so.
     
  4. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    I plan on getting married before graduating, and it really seemed like the Navy was more conducive with starting a family. I also liked the idea of the Navy being smaller, and the fact that you aren't deployed on the ground in a war zone. Also, the idea of having to do PT at 6 in the morning for the duration of my employment rubbed me the wrong way
     
  5. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    I'm not sure whether or not it's something I want to do for 20 years. Ultimately, I would really like to have my own practice around where I grew up in northeast MT. The idea that you are constantly rotating the type of law you're practicing was also appealing, as you sort of have to be a jack of all trades when practicing in a place as rural as where I call home.

    Would you consider the experience gained in Navy JAG directly transferable to civilian practice?

    Did you serve for 20 years?

    Was it ever difficult balancing work and family?

    Apologies for all the questions. It's a big commitment and I want to make the most informed decision I can. And aside from the recruiter, I haven't had the chance to discuss the opportunity with someone from the inside!
     
  6. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Ha...u wish sir!....lol....a lawyers a lawyer. Lol



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  7. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Everything u just listed as a neg for the Army applies to the navy as well. On my 1st deployment i was security for a jag Team that was mainly Navy in Baghdad at the central criminal court of Iraq. Also iv never seen a JAG doing pt

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  8. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    First, as I understand it from the presentation I attended, Navy JAGs do not usually have the opportunity to be deployed until they approach their 10th year (please, anyone, correct me if I am wrong on that).

    Second, the PT assertion was something the Army JAG mentioned when asked what he didn't like about the job (i.e. now being over 30 with a JD having to go out at 6 am and get his butt whooped by a group of guys 10 years younger than him).

    Third, the allure of the Navy being smaller was speaking to the fact that a Navy JAG has to deal with people getting in trouble for stupid offenses less than an Army JAG does, simply because they have less members. This comment was made in support of the assertion that the Navy JAG, in general, is more capable of offering regular working hours. The recruiter went so far as to say that in 10 years of being in the Navy JAG corps, not once was it necessary to work outside of a regular 9-5 shift.

    Finally, the Navy JAG made the assertion that the Navy was better at working with those JAGs who have families. Essentially making the statement that the Navy JAG corps was more accommodating than the Army JAG corps. Though I cannot recall on what grounds she staked that assertion other than point three mentioned above.
     
  9. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Look brother if u want a normal "9-5" your looking in the wrong area in both areas...law and military.....
    Ive been in 14 years have a wife and 2 kids. My son was born when i was inin Iraq. My 1st 9 yrs i was an MP the last 6 have been as a recruiter. Nothing about military service is normal. Honestly man joining the military probably isn't for you.b

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  10. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    I sincerely appreciate your insight and for sharing your opinion. However,I don't think the assertion that the JAG corps isn't for me is a fair assertion to make based on the limited information I've provided here.

    I like to think that I have few allusions as to what working in the legal profession will entail. How to properly regulate time spent working has been discussed in detail since my arrival at law school as a means to maintain self-health. I thought the assertion made by the recruiter was a slight stretch, as there are inevitably times that a lawyer will have to stay in the office past 5 to make a deadline. But by no means does staying at the office late need to be made into a habit.

    Additionally, I imagine the day-to-day dealings of a JAG lawyer bear a stark contrast to those of others enlisted. Admittedly, I am making these assumptions in a relative fog, as I still know very little. However, that's why I'm posting here; in the hope of gaining more information pertinent to the realities of the profession. And with that I reiterate my sincere appreciation for sharing your perspective.
     
  11. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Your right. I was basing it off of your comment aboubt pt late hrs and not wanting to go to war. In my opinion, as a combat vet who is still serving, anyone who doesnt want to go to war should not serve in any branch

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  12. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    If you're talking about "going to war" on a macro level, no; I'd rather see a world absent war. However, because I am not blind to the inherent flaws of man, I see the necessity of war in defending ideas of democracy and liberty around the globe, as well as protecting our national interests abroad. Two causes I consider to be incredibly noble.

    If you're talking about "going to war" on the individual level, I don't think the skill set I have been refining for the last several years would enable me to serve my country to the best of my ability by "going to war" on the field of battle. I think six years of specialized schooling have better prepared me to potentially serve my country in the courtroom.
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017
  13. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    What if u were sent overseas? Thats what im saying Brother. All service members MAY end up n that situation. When I was on that mission as the security for those JAGs, got ambushed and i had JAGs pullin security and manning turrets of HMMWVs while we looked for the jackoff that detonated the IED..so it could happens.

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  14. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    First, if the recruiter’s lips move, he’s lying.

    No, you can deploy well before the 10th year—usually at sea. We were worried I would miss my daughter’s birth during Desert Shield.

    No, it is not a 9-5 job, particularly if you are in trial work. I turned down the last applicant who was looking for a 9-5 job.

    I did three years active and 22 in the reserve.

    If your civilian practice is trial work, you will be head and shoulders above others of your vintage if you were a trial attorney in the JAG.

    I’m unaware of any successful lawyer in private practice who does not spend long hours at the office on a regular basis. Last night I left about 8:00. Most of my Saturdays are either at the office or playing Mason.

    Oh, and yes, we JAGs PT. Usually not together, but we have to pass the tests and there are weight standards.
     
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  15. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    My father was Airborne and he frequently repeats the same mantra about recruiters!

    That was one thing the recruiter did mention - that trial work is the most time consuming of any field. It's helpful to know that trial work is the area most beneficial in finding a job after serving.

    Additionally, the recruiter did explain that there are physical tests and weight standards, but that passing said tests and meeting said requirements was up to your own volition. Is this an accurate statement?

    Were you ultimately deployed during Desert Shield?

    Can you speak to what benefits are/aren't available to you after 3 years active and 22 reserve? Most of what the recruiter discussed were the benefits available to those who served 10 years active and beyond. If this is a question you'd feel more comfortable answering privately, feel free to private message me.

    And thank you for the information!
     
  16. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    Very good point. The way the information was presented to me, such a situation was never suggested. Valuable insight!
     
  17. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    No, you have tests each year and weight standards to meet each year. Now, you can only do the minimum. However, if you wish to have a bullet on your annual evaluation, you will score st the top. Line officers often sit in promotion boards, and that can be important for some.

    I spent my time overseas in a Law Office or Court room. One of my good friends did a carrier tour. Six months at a time away from home. He was then stationed in Gulfport, MS. Another friend was on a sub tender.

    After three years, you will qualify for veteran loans. If you are asking the current retirement plans, I don’t know them. I will tell you that when I got my 20 year letter qualifying me for a retirement at age 60 as a reservist, it was a great lift. Getting the check is quite alright too.
     
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  18. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    To the point on how seriously PT scores are taken, See http://www.navytimes.com/news/your-...s-fired-accused-of-falsifying-fitness-scores/
     
  19. Norski_406

    Norski_406 Registered User

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    Interesting! Physical fitness is definitely not a huge concern. I do a lot of back country hunting in the mountains, and really I just hold a preference for working out on my own!

    Are you entitled to vet healthcare in your situation? Does the G.I Bill apply to any of your family members?

    Would you consider the legal environment during your active duty supportive? Were senior practitioners there to help as you were tasked with unfamiliar areas of law?
     
  20. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    I’m a retiree so I have a very good insurance policy rest of my life. My sons both served (one still does) so they had their own benefit. I did not receive any.

    Legally, yes you have trainers as a junior attorney. Sometimes the quality of leadership is lacking.
     

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