Bro. Richard Bernard "Red" Skelton

Discussion in 'Notable Freemasons' started by Blake Bowden, Oct 8, 2013.

  1. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

    5,619
    1,040
    113
    [​IMG]

    Richard Bernard "Red" Skelton (July 18, 1913 – September 17, 1997) was an American entertainer best known for being a national radio and television comedian between 1937 and 1971. Skelton, who has stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, began his show business career in his teens as a circus clown and continued on vaudeville and Broadway and in films, radio, TV, nightclubs, and casinos, all while he pursued an entirely separate career as an artist.

    Red Skelton was a Freemason, a member of Vincennes Lodge No. 1, in Indiana. He also was a member of both the Scottish and York Rite. He was the recipient of the Gold Medal of the General Grand Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, for Distinguished Service in the Arts and Sciences. On September 24, 1969, he received the honorary 33° in the Scottish Rite and was a Gourgas Medal recipient in 1995. Skelton was also a Shriner in Los Angeles, California. Skelton became interested in Masonry as a small boy selling newspapers in Vincennes, when a man bought a paper from him with a five dollar bill and told him to keep the change. The young Skelton asked his benefactor why he had given him so much money; the man explained that he was a Mason and Masons are taught to give. Skelton decided to become one also when he was grown.

    Source: wikipedia
     
    Warrior1256 likes this.
  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

    7,474
    3,415
    183
    Really, really great article! He was a great entertainer and a patriotic American. Watched his show every week when I was just a little boy.
     
  3. flipster

    flipster Registered User

    71
    29
    18
    It was said by a local man in our town that he was the step-son or Red. I live in the house the ersatz step-son owned. A relative said that the story was just the poor recollections of an old man, and did not contain truth. It was a fun local legend around town, though.
     

Share My Freemasonry