Good Books to read??

Discussion in 'Recommended Reading' started by b-mac, May 31, 2013.

  1. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    The proficiencies are plenty of work for each degree. Outside reading will compete with that work. This alone is a good reason to forgo outside reading between your initiation and raising.

    Before initiation I read about masonic philosophy and history. Between initiation I focused on returning my work. After I had presented my MM proficiency I no long had that conflict. Then again after I had presented my MM proficiency I was in the line working to learn my parts is I progressed. I resumed most of my outside reading as a Past Master.

    So I have two recommendations. Wait until you have been raised because you want to focus your efforts on the proficiencies. Then consider going into the progressive line and focusing on those parts. There's time.
     
  2. BrianMcMLG

    BrianMcMLG Registered User

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    Dfreybur, what you said makes perfect sense regarding why it is better to wait. I suppose that would fall under circumventing my desires, in this case, my natural urge to learn as much as I can when it comes to new things. It is true, I have plenty of time ahead. I may as well not overwhelm myself straight out of the gate and focus my learning on those things that are neccessary for me to learn at this time.

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  3. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    There is enough masonic reading material to peruse and study to last a lifetime, you won't soon run out. There's plenty of time, and material, after you have been raised. ^_^


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  4. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    You should read "A Pilgrim's Path" by John Robinson. It is possibly the finest book ever written about Masonry, by a non-Mason. Mr. Robinson wanted to write a book about Masonry, and since he was not a Mason, he figured he could be objective, and not be biased. He wrote an excellent book, and he was so impressed with what he found about Masonry, that he went on an petitioned the Craft.
     

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