In whom do you place your trust?

Discussion in 'Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality' started by 6229 MAC, Oct 13, 2010.

  1. 6229 MAC

    6229 MAC Registered User

    46
    1
    0
    When we were asked, "in cases of difficulty and danger, in whom do you put your trust?", the answer informed the brethren that we were believers in a Supreme Ruler of the Universe. Individuals who, with the aid of Divine Wisdom, and the secrets of our Masonic Art, might someday display the beauties of true godliness, exhibit social and moral virtue, and bring honour to our fraternity.

    As we were taught the meaning of the ancient signs and symbols, the fundamental principles of our Order were embedded in our minds.
    We learned to put into practice the cardinal virtues of Temperance, Fortitude, Prudence and Justice, while enjoying a mutual exchange of fraternal feelings. We became tolerant of the debilities of others, and open and sincere in our praise. We learned that it is the internal and not external qualifications of a man that Masonry regards.
    We were taught to be "good men, true and strictly to obey the moral law". There is no equivocation of any kind. It must be obeyed strictly, and not according to the personal views of the individual. It demands exactitude of its performance in the everyday life of Freemasons.
    When the time comes for us to leave this life, will our obituary print the truth? Will our life have reflected honour on our fraternity?

    Such is the nature of our Institution, and may the Great Architect shine on our Fraternity, forever and ever.
     
  2. owls84

    owls84 Moderator Premium Member

    1,653
    9
    38
    Re: In whonm do you place your trust?

    Where do you get your great posts? Are they made up or articles you come across?
     
  3. 6229 MAC

    6229 MAC Registered User

    46
    1
    0
    Re: In whonm do you place your trust?


    In the heart of every Mason there is the power to cultivate the principles found in the various lectures of the three degrees. However, some are lazy and will not consider the journey and wait for a more convenient time. Seek and you will find... Thank you for the question, hope you found the answer. Mac.:
     
  4. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

    5,676
    1,036
    113
    Keep em coming! I enjoy them :)
     
  5. peace out

    peace out Premium Member

    226
    0
    36
    Good post.



    FIFY

    I joined Freemasonry not to promote it, but to learn from it. I feel as if everyone joining Freemasonry is already at a certain moral elevation and join the brotherhood to further promote morals and civility.
     
  6. rhitland

    rhitland Founding Member Premium Member

    1,417
    9
    58
    This brings up the question what is moral law? I had a pretty good discussion with another Mason last night who disagreed with me on an issue citing it morally wrong. I then grab him by the grip and whispered that is where we disagree brother I do not feel it is morally wrong and I respect the fact you do. The discussion ended there but we did have a moral disagreement and while we discussed it on the level nether one of us felt we where wrong and i bet his resolve in his believe in his moral system is as strong as mine. This brings me back to my question what is moral law and can it be universal for all people? Or has moral law become misunderstood and misquoted for personal gain? That question is polluted by my personal view that moral law can be universal for all.
     
  7. rhitland

    rhitland Founding Member Premium Member

    1,417
    9
    58
    by the way love the post got some good thoughts sparking in the ole noggin
     
  8. peace out

    peace out Premium Member

    226
    0
    36
    You have me more curious as to the moral law you were discussing. Spill the beans.
     
  9. rhitland

    rhitland Founding Member Premium Member

    1,417
    9
    58
    oh I fear that would hijack this thread! tell you what keep your eye out I will see if I can find the thread on hear about the very issue we discussed.
     
  10. peace out

    peace out Premium Member

    226
    0
    36
    I feel that moral law is defensible, like science. An action will generate a reaction. The art is in the subtly of the actions and reactions.

    I think a moral idea can be calculated by tracing reason down to the essence of mankind's pursuit.

    So for instance, I won't steal a car. Why? Taking the answer "it's wrong" (and any form thereof) out of the equation, I am left with the following list.

    • I might go to jail
    • My wife might leave me
    • I might put my family at risk
    • My kids may learn to steal
    • My community may shun me
    • Live my life constantly looking over my shoulder
    Now, taking one of those ideas and expanding....I might go to jail...Why?

    • To keep me from the opportunity to do it again while incarcerated
    • To show me it is not acceptable to society
    • To bring justice both to me and to the one whose car was stolen
    Expanding again....To bring justice...Why?

    • Without justice, there is little content in life for the victim
    • Without justice, there is risk of rampant crime
    • To demonstrate right from wrong in societal terms.
    Expanding....Why is contentedness important? This answer becomes more fundamental yet philosophical. The classic liberal theology (not the democrat-liberal sense) states that the ultimate goal of humanity is happiness. This was the common school of thought of our Founding Fathers. Hence, we have terms like, the pursuit of happiness, and bill of rights. These ideas were based on securing an environment where one can pursue happiness as one sees fit while not impeding on another's pursuit.

    This is also why our Founding Fathers stated that our government most certainly legislates morals. John Adams wrote "t is religion and morality alone which can establish the principles upon which freedom can securely stand. The only foundation of a free constitution is pure virtue." Mankind has figured out that we must coexist peacefully and with virtue so secure our individual liberties.

    This, my Brothers, is why I joined Freemasonry.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2010
  11. 6229 MAC

    6229 MAC Registered User

    46
    1
    0
    The Moral GPS is broken in today's "take or leave it, mind set". What I think counts, what you think counts...So how will you proceed that WE may arrive at its meaning? By letter or syllable..
    Brethren, when you go to a football game; you expect, football. When you go to a Masonic Lodge; what do you expect?

    Thank you, Brethren
     
  12. JohnnyFlotsam

    JohnnyFlotsam Premium Member

    485
    62
    28
    Excellent question!

    I expect nothing less than the earnest pursuit of "things we can agree on". That excludes the use of all sectarian doctrine except any portions of which can be shown to be truly universal. That's actually pretty difficult. It's a labor that demands both conviction and open-mindedness at the same time. I'm talking about the conviction, not to mention courage, to maintain one's faith in his chosen beliefs while encouraging his Brother, who may have rather different beliefs, to do the same thing. I am talking about the open-mindedness to realize that our beliefs differ in many ways and that that's OK, so long as we confine those differences to ourselves and instead devote our labors to finding the commonality.
    The lessons of the Degrees, and the Master Mason's Charge in particular, spell all of this out beautifully, of course. We just have to make the effort to take them to heart.
     
  13. peace out

    peace out Premium Member

    226
    0
    36
    So mote it be, Brother Johnny.
     

Share My Freemasonry