Lack of Fellowship?

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by BroJordan, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. BroJordan

    BroJordan Registered User

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    Does anyone else ever run into a brother that doesn't seem to really grasp the meaning of the trowel in their travels? At work I meet many brothers and when I mention that I too am a member of the craft, I'll sometimes receive nothing more than a nod or a "cool." I just feel like meeting a man on his travels is something worth conversing about with one another.


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  2. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes I have. To be truthful I sometimes feel as though I'm not taken seriously because I'm relatively young for a mason (30) but I've also come across brothers who only seem interested in building relationships with others who can help them accomplish their goals, usually related to rank.

    It's unfortunate but all a young mason can do is work hard to prove his worth and all we can do about masons only interested in rank is to guard the west gate.
     
  3. rhitland

    rhitland Founding Member Premium Member

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    Us young ones are much more comfortable talking about the craft outside of lodge. My grandpa would not talk much masonry with me even when I was a master as well, so I do not believe it is anything but a difference in generations. I do not get it but hey whatever makes sleep at night!


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  4. BroJordan

    BroJordan Registered User

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    I understand where both of you are coming from. I myself am only 22 and the third youngest in my lodge. I work at a place where I meet brothers from across the country. Most of these men are 30 or so. So not really much of a different generation. Either way, I have a masonic fire in me that I want to talk about but nobody that I meet seems to care. Kind of a bummer.


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  5. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    Well I'm from a small lodge in rural Texas so I felt like that as well until I found these forums. Fortunately we're starting to get some newer like-minded members at my lodge.

    You'll find most of us here are pretty open-minded and helpful so hopefully your time here will help feed that fire of yours.
     
  6. BroJordan

    BroJordan Registered User

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    I completely agree that this app is a great idea. However, I still wish brothers that I met face to face would be more friendly.


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  7. solomon1979

    solomon1979 Registered User

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    I get that from some brothers also. Im sure everyone has as well. Its hard to get some people to take you seriously. Some people cant see past your skin color,ethnicity,attire or even our hairstyle.


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  8. MarkR

    MarkR Premium Member

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    Be generous in your analysis of their actions. A lot of brothers are not certain what they are allowed to talk about outside of a tyled lodge, so their fallback position is just not to talk about it at all.
     
  9. Roy Vance

    Roy Vance Certified Premium Member

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    I can see your point, Brother Mark, but a few well spoken questions, and a true Brother will be shown and the conversation can proceed from there. A good Masonic communication doesn't have to have anything to do with ritual or things that the profane don't need to know, just things like getting a degree team together or what time the next meeting at your/his lodge is, things like that. Or maybe even, have you seen the East yet, that is something only a Brother would understand and a profane would not have clue what we were talking about. The conversations don't have to be all "that" secret, just don't talk like you are in a tyled lodge. Just sayin'....
     
  10. Michael Neumann

    Michael Neumann Premium Member

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    Correct, many of the newer brethren are reluctant to speak on the subject because they are not completely sure what is and is not fair game outside the lodge room. On the flip side many of the older gents I have spoken two were reluctant to speak or even be known as a mason outside the lodge room. However, the more knowledgeable ones speak more openly on the matter after a quick test. I was raised at 24... I think? I do remember however that I was the second youngest in my lodge and was very eager to learn as much as possible as quickly as possible. My home library is filled with volumes on Masonry from the years I have spent reading about our craft.
     
  11. Bro_Vick

    Bro_Vick Moderator Premium Member

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    This could be a comfort level thing, and far more on the individuals personality than anything else. I wrote in another thread that a brief co-worker of mine was a Mason, and when I went up to him and talked to him about it he completely shut down on me and denied he was a Mason, even though he had a Square and Compasses on his truck.

    Talk about awkward!

    So, who knows. I have ran into brothers while traveling who have been warm and greeting, so keep your head up. ;)

    S&F,
    -Bro Vick
     
  12. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Some brothers are slow to acknowledge masonry.

    Other brothers go out of their way to connect. I'll see a certain number of headlight flashes in my mirror or a certain wave and end up stopping to have a coffee with a brother. I'll see a ring or my ring will be seen and we'll hang out for a while chatting.

    Pay attention to one set of events. Ignore one set of events. Up to you which is which.
     
  13. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    I guess I'm lucky in that I've gotten lots of people approach me and whatnot, both PH and non. Had fellas come up to me and give me the grip out of the blue before too. Maybe it is because I'm a little older (38)? Or maybe its the beard or what have you.

    Or the shirt I wear that says "Ask me about free beer!" :thumbup1:

    I guess I see things from the perspective I did when I was single and at the dance halls every night. I never had any trouble finding a partner for every song, because I had no fear of rejection. If the pretty lady I asked said no, I just said "thanks anyway, Ma'am", and went on to the next lady. Even if I got two nos for every yes I still got a yes right quick. Then later that night I'd ask one of the nos again, thinking that hey, they've seen I know how to dance by now, maybe they changed their minds - and usually they'd say yes.

    One of these times google the Myers Briggs personality test. Its Jungian influenced stuff, and by no means definitive - but take a sample test somewhere on the internet. I'm an ENFP, according to a bunch of samples in different workplaces I've taken - which means I'm outgoing and so forth and so on. Others are by nature different. I think its sort of important to understand the different personality types (either the Myers Briggs way or one of the various others) because its interesting for one, and because it helps you to understand other people's motivations and the way they see the world.

    A simpler way to put it - a person who is upbeat, warm, and so forth just has to shrug off the sour pusses. They'll either come along for the ride or they won't, and sometimes they are shy and have to observe you a while and then they jump on board your way of seeing things. Thats a simple way of saying a lot of the introverts follow the extroverts, if you have the sensitivity to understand their way of seeing things and not to be too torn up about their way of doing things, and have the patience to let them come around.
     
  14. BroJordan

    BroJordan Registered User

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    I don't think that's enough of a reason to not be friendly and welcoming to your fellow brothers though. If you're going to be a mason, embrace the idea of being in a fraternity of men that went through the same initiations you did and have a sense of brotherhood. Just my opinion. To each his own.


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