Mental illness...

Discussion in 'Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality' started by sudo, Mar 21, 2018.

  1. sudo

    sudo Registered User

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    Has being a part of the brotherhood helped you mentally, in times of anguish?
    I feel it's not best to associate myself with labels because it may just make things worse, but I do have times of severe depression, lack of spirituality, and anxiety.

    Have you seen people with conditions like this improve from truly applying themselves in the craft?

    I think what I need is a family that's spiritually oriented. A brotherhood that not only helps the community, but helps improve one another on an intimate level. A lot of my past research has pointed to this idea with Freemasonry.

    Any opinions, advice, or experiences would be greatly appreciated.
     
    AFMR E.I.Wells likes this.
  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Well, in a round about way I know at least one example of which you speak. A good friend of mine and Masonic Brother lost his wife of over 50 years. He stated that attending lodge functions and being with his Brothers greatly helped him through his loss.
     
    sudo likes this.
  3. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Improve? I’m not sure I would use that term. To help cope? Yes. Involvement with others takes one self out of one’s own mind and misery, to an extent. Again, to an extent. There is still silent anguish in the midst of others.
     
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  4. hanzosbm

    hanzosbm Premium Member

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    Freemasonry has helped me to better understand my relationship with God, my place in the universe, and my purpose here. In that way, I am able to look at the events in my life which might cause depression and anxiety in a different, and at least for me, more constructive manner.
    Regarding the family and community of Freemasonry, I'd be cautious about what you're expecting to find. While some lodges in some places may truly offer that, in my experience, it is not nearly as close knit as many perspective brothers have come to believe, and I've seen several new Masons leave disappointed that the brotherhood was not very close.
     
    sudo likes this.
  5. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    We have 3 members of our lodge who have problems with mental illness, 2 from depression, one from BiPolar. What is great is we have a lodge where this is openly discussed because the members themselves have raised it. You can only help someone when you know they are in trouble and too often as men, we dont admit our problems when we could use help.

    So, yes, the lodge has helped them by giving them a space where they feel welcome and treated as brothers despite their problems... but I have direct experience of this from a family member, and one of our brothers has had psychosis, and I wonder how we would cope with that.. fraternally I guess, but I am thankful it is a problem we have not had to deal with, but I think the lodge has given them purpose and a safe place to be valued, and that is important - and frankly, and this is probably part of our success, we need those brothers, and many of our members have truly earned the title of "Brother" in supporting their fellow lodge members.
     
    sudo likes this.
  6. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    What is 'madman' or a 'person of unsound mind' defined as in masonry?
     
  7. hanzosbm

    hanzosbm Premium Member

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    Based on some of the brothers I've met over the years, that definition must be pretty loose.
     
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  8. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    Lol, that's very funny :D
     
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  9. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Lol, Agreed.
    Yes, it was.
     
  10. Matt L

    Matt L Site Benefactor

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    As Brother Cook said "to help cope". I carry some things with me from my days in the Marine Corps and my job as a Police Officer. I always held it very close, you know had to be the tuff guy that could handle anything. I have been able to talk to my Brothers who are veterans and know, they know where I'm coming from. I also know they will not tell a soul.
    It's very comforting to me and helps me "cope". I don't trust the confidentiality of my agency's eap program and didn't talk to anyone in the service because I didn't want to appear weak. But I will admit I should have done it long ago.
     
  11. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    The reason I asked the above is because it is mentioned in our degrees, however, by no means am I implying a man with PTSD, particularly well-managed, should be declined membership into Freemasonry. On the other hand, known borderlines, schizophrenics, to name a few, would be something to reconsider.
     
  12. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    I know EXACTLY where you are coming from in this regard Brother.
     
    Bill Lins likes this.
  13. sudo

    sudo Registered User

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    Thanks for the responses guys.
    I'm glad to see a great deal of positive outcomes for people.

    Even if it's not so tightly knit in every lodge, there's always the potential for spiritual growth, and along with that, a better, more positive life.
     
    Bloke likes this.

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