Please help identify this Freemason symbol

Discussion in 'History and Research' started by tetra777, Dec 10, 2014.

  1. tetra777

    tetra777 Registered User

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    I have acquired a 1930's Railroad water pitcher used mostly in dining cars. It was made by Reed & Barton. What is unusual is that it is stamped with a Freemason symbol on the lid. The symbol with the letter G looks standard, but surrounding it is , at top, appears to be Letter M?, then on each side is a C?
    Also the circle has 2 points on the left side. I am trying to find out if anyone may know if this belongs to a unique group of masons.
    I thank you in advance for any info.[​IMG] 7 (1).jpg 7 (2).jpg
     
  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Don't know but is looks very cool. Congratulations, very nice collectable.
     
  3. Bro. Staton

    Bro. Staton Registered User

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    I think it's only accent lettering or designs I don't believe it's any linkage other then design purposes only... However,these pieces are selling for around 700 bucks you have a nice find there.
     
  4. NY.Light

    NY.Light Registered User

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    Just a possible guess. Maybe initials of the original owner?
     
  5. bezobrazan

    bezobrazan Registered User

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    I think it"s a Labrynth.
     
  6. tetra777

    tetra777 Registered User

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    Yes, I agree with you all. It was probably made for an individual, who liked the Labrynth.
    The eleven-circuit labyrinths include the circular design of the Chartres Cathedral, whose design is from the tradition of the knights templar.
    According to legend was carried from King Solomon’s temple to France.
    There is even speculation that Chartres -- noted for having the distinction of no one being buried within the cathedral -- is also the final resting place of theArk of the covenant. I do thank you all for your input.
    Please feedback anymore ideas you may have on this riddle.
     

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