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questions brothers ask and answer in public?

cemab4y

Premium Member
I like to inject some humor! Like "Watch out for those (number) guys"! "They will hit you right in the (body part)" or "I see you have kissed the (****), etc.
 

Jay Welch

Registered User
I was asked by a Mason if I was a travelling man? To which I replied Yeah man aren't we all! I was not yet a Mason but I was most certainly a travelling man since I was working on a pipeline job hundreds of miles from home as were all the other men on the jobsite. It quickly became clear to the fellow that he had made a mistake. But all things happen for a reason, this guy turned out to be a very positive force in my life an is one of the biggest reasons that I eventually joined the lodge. An ole fellow that went by the nickname Popeye. Popeye if you're out there I love you man thanks for all of your time! I would say keep it very simple and don't be bashful. I love being asked by brother Masons or Non Masons. I always walk away with a smile...and maybe a new friend!
 

BroBook

Premium Member
I heard a new one in the bank a couple of weeks ago " hey, I don't know you but there is a rumor, that you are a traveling man.
 

Travelling Man91

Registered User
I generally use "I see you're a travelin' man" because I think it is a nice, friendly way to greet someone new. It's not a real method of "trying" someone, nor does it need to be. I am not going to meet someone for the first time in Walmart, a restaurant, or a party and start discussing Masonic degree work with them.

For that matter, if I bump into one of the members of my own lodge in one of those settings, esoteric work isn't going to really be discussed, either.

There is a difference between recognizing someone as a Mason and trying someone.
 
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Canadian Paul

Registered User
Same here!

Although I know that some of our Scots brethren like to ask each other how old their Mothers are, with the answer being the Lodge's number apparently.
I've heard of that question but if its asked of a member of a Scottish Lodge like me you may get some rather odd answers - in my case, "Sixteen hundred and seventy-nine"!
 

acjohnson53

Registered User
If I am lit up and I am approached some brothers would say there Lodge name, or we share thoughts on the weather. I meet a lot of brothers in the airport and they are very receptive by offering me assistance if needed...
 

DwayneM

Registered User
My late father was a PM, and I remember as a kid, whenever we'd see some "stranger" and him greet each other as old friends, we'd ask my mom, "Fireman or Mason?" It was always one or the other. The only question we caught, though, was "I see you're a traveling man. " To which my father replied, "Have you been to the East? "
 

Warrior1256

Site Benefactor
My late father was a PM, and I remember as a kid, whenever we'd see some "stranger" and him greet each other as old friends, we'd ask my mom, "Fireman or Mason?" It was always one or the other. The only question we caught, though, was "I see you're a traveling man. " To which my father replied, "Have you been to the East? "
I've heard a similar exchange.
 

Warrior1256

Site Benefactor
I generally give my name and Lodge affiliation when approached...or Brothers approach me and give their name and Lodge affiliation..
Same here. When first raised I asked my mentor how he handled this time of situation. I thought that there must be some formal, secret way that Masons introduced themselves. He told me that he stuck out his hand and said "Hi. My name's Mark I'm from lodge so and so. What lodge are you from?'. So much for the secret greeting, lol.
 

RhushidaK

Registered User
Well bringing back an old thread from the dead..
Are these questions location-dependent? Coz I've never been taught through any of the three degrees any of them.
 
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