racial/religious tolerance and understanding

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Philos, Sep 24, 2015.

  1. Philos

    Philos Registered User

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    I know Freemasonry is open to all those who believe in a supreme being. Additionally, Freemasonry teaches, among many other things, tolerance and logic. How can someone call themselves a Mason in and outside of the lodge, but still vehemently carry a prejudice against other religions that are not their own?

    This comes on the heels of the recent anniversary of 9/11 and I see brothers posting derogatory remarks about Islam on their social media accounts.

    How does one handle the prejudice jabs made in the lodge? There isn't supposed to be any discussion of politics or religion in the lodge so when someone makes continuously racist/prejudice remarks, it irks me so much because engaging them in a reasonable and polite discussion is inappropriate.
     
  2. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    No person or institution is perfect. Remember, even Jesus had Judas.
     
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  3. Philos

    Philos Registered User

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    I've learned to accept that in other groups such as my coworkers or fellow alumni of my Alma Mater, but it is one of the staples of this institution to promote brotherly love and tolerance. I don't think this is just something to chalk up to people being imperfect, this is someone clearly ignoring one of the BIG characteristics of being a Mason.
     
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  4. phulseapple

    phulseapple Premium Member

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    Sounds like it may be time for some quiet counsel.....
     
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  5. hanzosbm

    hanzosbm Premium Member

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    Well, there are a few different issues here.

    In lodge; not appropriate. NO discussion of religion is supposed to be taking place.
    On social media; that's their business.

    You don't have to like their views, you don't have to agree with them, but they're allowed to have them. Regarding tolerance, I'm not aware of any Masonic teachings having to do with tolerance. It's a wonderful thing to practice and I think everyone should, but it's not part of the teachings that I can think of.
     
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  6. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Remember though, that while U.S. GLs are ecumenical, we recognize GLs which are limited to Christians, and we have appendant orders which are Christian, and even Trinitarian Christian (not referring to KT).
     
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  7. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Agreed.
     
  8. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    This is exactly why we have a landmark that forbids the discussion of sectarian religion in tiled lodge meetings. Men can and do have principles that they fail to live up to and even don't even know they are failing to live up to them.

    These are outside of tiled meetings. I am aware this is a lame response. Consider that men become friends with individual people but tend to class groups of people they don't know together. It's a part of human nature that is irrational.

    Consider that accepting a brother is not the same as accepting their religion. Often it's not even the same thing as knowing what a brother's religion is. This is a deliberate part of how the fraternity was designed and/or evolved.

    If it happens in a tiled meeting it is imperative the WM gavel the brother down. "My brother, we do not discuss such matters in our meetings. WHACK".

    It does sometimes happen at refreshment in the lodge building. Best to steer the conversation away from the topic.

    I notice the word "racial" in the subject. Islam has a very effective mechanism to erase racism from their most important members - The shared experience of the Haaj. Prosperous Muslims from all over the world participate in the Haaj and they experience first hand the diversity of the Muslim world. Once a Muslim has done the Haaj he is from that day forward Haaji.

    Think on that and how the experience of our degrees do the same for so many brothers and should for all. Once a Brother is raised he is from that day forward a Master Mason. A (deliberate?) parallel.
     
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