San Antonio Lodge Search

Discussion in 'Becoming a Freemason' started by JCeire, Apr 1, 2017.

  1. JCeire

    JCeire Registered User

    6
    4
    3
    I'm a new member to the site, but a longtime lurker. I'm looking to join a lodge in San Antonio. I'm located on the north side, not too far from the Alzafar Shrine complex, but I don't really mind traveling around San Antonio. Most important, I'm looking for a lodge that has an ample social aspect in addition to quality ritual, one that would ideally have more than a few brothers in a similar age group (20s/30s). I have a few lodges that I will reach out to soon, but I wanted to get the opinions and advice of the forum. Any and all constructive comments are welcome. Thanks in advance.
     
    Ripcord22A likes this.
  2. Brother JC

    Brother JC Vigilant Staff Member

    3,181
    2,010
    183
    Go, meet, discuss. It sounds like you have a good plan. I don't personally know the San Antonio area but there is at least one Brother here who does.
    Best wishes on your journey.
     
    Ripcord22A likes this.
  3. JCeire

    JCeire Registered User

    6
    4
    3
    Just to try and move the thread along, the two lodges I am considering petitioning are Alamo 44 and Perfect Union 10; not knowing much information on either, however, I would appreciate any general insight. Cheers.
     
  4. JMartinez

    JMartinez Registered User

    171
    63
    28
    You should try Helotes Lodge as well as Davy Crockett


    Sent from my iPhone using My Freemasonry
     
    MRichard likes this.
  5. JCeire

    JCeire Registered User

    6
    4
    3
    Update: I've been caught up recently and haven't had the chance to go and visit any lodge or speak with any local members. Just wanted to reach out and see if anyone else had advice before continuing onwards. Cheers.
     
  6. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

    4,275
    3,009
    133
    Success waits for no man. Just jump in and make contact with a lodge.
     
  7. Phil P

    Phil P Registered User

    189
    162
    43
    I visited a couple of lodges before I petitioned. Mainly I just attended the dinners on the stated meeting nights over a few months & that way the members got to know me. You might also want to ask about their fees & dues as well. Perhaps one will have a better deal for ya
     
    Bloke likes this.
  8. Dow Mathis

    Dow Mathis Premium Member

    180
    23
    38
    This.

    You'll never know if you'll fit in with a lodge until you go and visit. My advice to EVERY man interested in the craft is to seek out a lodge in your area and go visit. Eat a meal with them, or two, or five. Find out what they're like. Find out whether you think you'll fit in. Not only must you get to know the men there to make a decision, it's vitally important that the men at a lodge get to know YOU. The first time I visited my lodge, I ended up in the kitchen making mashed potatoes. When you work next to a man, you get to know him better. This is true whether you are working in a kitchen, building a fence, or whatever.

    Are you married? If so, take your wife. Have kids? Take them too. It's important that your wife support you in this. My wife and son have dinner each month at the lodge before stated meetings. The men there (and their families) have become like our extended family.

    Remember, you're not just choosing a lodge, you're choosing the men you'll be spending a lot of time with. Likewise, they're deciding whether they'd like to spend a lot of time with you. If you don't sense a fit, then look elsewhere. Hold off on submitting a petition until you've found a place you feel welcome at. It's easier for everyone that way. One of the petition questions has to do with whether you've submitted one before, and if your answer is yes, then the circumstances of that previous petition must be investigated before proceeding further.

    Phil's comment about fees and dues is important as well. There will be fees and dues, and you'll need to be able to meet those obligations. Likewise there will be demands on your time. You've got to be willing to meet those demands as well. Freemasonry is like a lot of other things. You reap in direct proportion to what you sow.

    Good luck to you, Sir.
     

Share My Freemasonry