Assembly Plants Seed for Legal Pot in California

Discussion in 'The Refreshment Lounge' started by Blake Bowden, Jan 13, 2010.

  1. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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  2. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

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    it's about time they got rid of these silly laws.
     
  3. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    There is a precedent. We can always look at nations with existing laws allowing drugs and see how they are faring.
     
  4. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

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    which ones are you bringing up?
     
  5. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    Amsterdam at least.
    Others http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_cannabis_by_country

    I know others have tried to legalize (I assume based on their own internal wellbeing) but the US ties support and funds to that, so smaller nations have backed off.

    Now, I said there is a precedent, I havent' researched to say whether its positive or negative precedent. But they haven't been repealed.

    One of the question in Bolivia is whether to continue the US plan of making plants illegal and eradicate them entirely (coca).
     
  6. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

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    LOL - how do environmentalists/biologists like that? why isn't the EPA getting upset about the destruction of naturally growing plants? :)
     
  7. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    They do - we use chemicals and procedures in Latin America that is illegal to use in the United States.
     
  8. Hippie19950

    Hippie19950 Premium Member

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    Speaking of Latin America, how are they doing with the Cocaine Projects?? Guess the CIA is still funding the efforts? Word had it the H my buds used in V.N was brought in by them too...
     
  9. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    The CIA has lost ground there. There's only one or two countries in the region that still sidestep entirely with what we want. Argentina's economic meltdown, plus a realist administration in Mexico, our support for recent coups and a series of competent plebes who had solid plans and could express themselves framed the last decade. Being more obvious about our motives didn't help either. (I spent a lot of the past decade reading their news outlets, etc)
     
  10. Scotty32

    Scotty32 Registered User

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    Let see next how many Taco Bells & Pizza Huts go up around there lol!
     
  11. HKTidwell

    HKTidwell Premium Member

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    Since we are on this discussion I'm a radical on this too. Gee go figure with all my other views.

    The "drug war" has not slowed down or reduced the amount of drugs that is grown within or brought in. All we have done is create more prisons and more people that have a record that can no longer fully benefit society. The good part to this we have more officers/Jail deputies, so we are creating jobs. Bad my tax dollars are being wasted on a lot of people that are not a threat.

    I don't understand why we are tarnishing a lot of good kids by ruining their records with alcohol, drug, and other ridiculous charges. You are changing their lives for ever. You know when I was a teenager I had a deputy that made me pour my beer out(I'd spent a lot of time and money acquiring) and didn't give me a ticket. My dads generation were picked up and taken home and parents busted butts for the most part or otherwise disciplined their kids. Kids are going to be kids, they are going to try drugs (alcohol, tobacco, other drugs), etc. I guess I just don't see the policies of the past as being effective, all we have done is cause alot of good people to be labeled criminals. Yes they broke the law I'm not arguing that, and this is coming from one of the few people that can say he has never tried a illegal substance (other then Alcohol and tobacco which was illegal when I first tried them).

    I also support dropping the age on alcohol to 18 or 16. If you are old enough to die for your country, own a house, pay taxes, make decision for yourself you should be allowed to drink. I mention 16 only because in some places this has been tried and it has been successful but is typically limited to Beer and not hard liquor. This is an American thing, must countries in the world have lesser restrictions if alcohol is permitted.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2010
  12. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    Lesser restrictions and fewer abuses if I recall.
     
  13. HKTidwell

    HKTidwell Premium Member

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    I meant to mention this, think about the potential tax revenue of legalization. We already deal with people who are abusers of substance now, so we would have a fund to deal with it and pay for other things that could use the increased revenue. Automatic change of expense to income.
     
  14. drapetomaniac

    drapetomaniac Premium Member Premium Member

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    I don't think I agree as much with refined cocaine - but when you mention revenue, I consider the fact that cocaine cartels have genetically engineered various cocaine strains to reduce detection.
    Besides the submarines and tunnels, there is definitely a revenue stream. Instead of putting it in public legitimate space, it's being forced into the illegitimate economy.
     

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