Being A Mason

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Frater Cliff Porter, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. Frater Cliff Porter

    Frater Cliff Porter Premium Member

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    We often hear that something is Masonic or un-Masonic. But what does it mean to be a Mason? What parts of the obligations are more important or the most important?

    Does a man who swears disqualify himself as living like a Mason? Does that man who fails to educate himself and argue effectively disqualify himself?

    How "good" of a Mason do you need to be to truly qualify for the title of Brother?

    I don't pretend to know the answers, but I will admit I reflect upon them often, especially when in my mind I fail at something.
     
  2. Brent Heilman

    Brent Heilman Premium Member

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    Very good food for thought Brother. I know I feel sometimes that I don't live up to the title of Brother and try to make the adjustments. It takes a lot to live the life we profess publicly and it takes a bigger man to admit when he fails or falls short. We all need to take the time to reflect more.
     
  3. MarkR

    MarkR Premium Member

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    I don't know exactly where the line is, but I had an uncle (RIP) who was a Mason. His sons told me that he taught them "in business you have to screw your friends, because your enemies won't do business with you." I think he missed the point of Freemasonry.
     
  4. jvarnell

    jvarnell Premium Member

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    It mean to me to show I am striving to be the best I can in all conditions. Also an oblegations by definition shall be met with equal importants.

    The only way someone can fail is to quit trying. Thomas Edison siad “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”

    But I would say yes to the first part of this Oboma should Disqualify himself but it is not failing it is just doing what he said he should will do if he doesn't do what he said he would do. Oboma said "if he doesn’t turn the economy around after three years in office, he’ll be a one-term president."

    Be all that you can be and remember Thomas Edison
     
  5. hirams son

    hirams son Registered User

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    Doesn't it mean to be human after all? To show how brotherhood works? To be generous and try to make our world better? That's what i think a mason is...that's what i think i amsomehow! I try to do my very best in treating everyone in the same way without considering colour or religion. I ama mason cause I'm convinced to do the right thing every day...
     
  6. daddyrich

    daddyrich Registered User

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    Obama? Are you serious with that?
     
  7. daddyrich

    daddyrich Registered User

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    I really hope I misread that. I hope being a Mason means that we are men who are always striving to be better men, using the tools of the builder as our guides and men who share an obligation to one another and their families and these bring writ large - to the rest of the world as well.
     
  8. jvarnell

    jvarnell Premium Member

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    I was answering what I feel about disqualification? and the fact is that is a quote that can be documented. It also show word do have meaning and we have to think about them before saying them. I was listing to the readio about the economie when I wrote it which colored what I was thinking at the time.
     
  9. daddyrich

    daddyrich Registered User

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    "It also show word do have meaning and we have to think about them before saying them." or typing them, it would seem. This is why politics are strictly verboten in Lodge.
     
  10. Phre-massen.nash

    Phre-massen.nash Registered User

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    Being a Mason to me, means that I will strive be be a better person for my family, my community, and myself. It is stated that we should not live 2 lifestyles. The same way I act in Lodge is the same way I govern myself in the community.

    I was talking to one of my newly Raised Master Masons, and I told him that when I put on a shirt with a Square and Compass, I find myself with my chest poked out, and walking upright. If I dont have on a /G\ shirt I still walk right, but with that shirt on, I am a reflection of not just my family, but of a brotherhood.

    I remember when I first became a Mason in 2003, women would tell me that I don't act like a lot of Masons that they know. I took this as a good thing, because they said most Masons they know are loud, arrogant, and usually obscene. She would ot believe that I was a Mason, I had to pull out my traveling card and show her that I was truely indeed a Mason.

    About a year ago I met an Eastern Star who told me that I am not like most Masons that she knows. Again I took this as an accomplishment. So the thing that sticks out to me is are we living the lifestyle that we should, in reference to the onligations, actions, and word. Are you living up to the Motto of making good men better, or are you letting your Masonic title, name, and status make the women and men who know you look at you and shake their heads . . .

    Only you can determine how a Mason should be. We look at the first three degrees and we may get different interpretations from them, but it all comes back to the same basis "Making good men better."

    Take due notice, and govern yourselves accordingly.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2012
  11. Phre-massen.nash

    Phre-massen.nash Registered User

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    THE MODEL MASON
    By Bro. ROB. MORRIS

    There's a fine old Mason in the land, he's genial, wise and true,
    His list of brothers comprehends, dear brothers, me and you;
    So warm his heart the snow blast fails to chill his generous blood,
    And his hand is like a giant's when outstretched to man or G-D;
    Reproach nor blame, nor any shame, has checked his course or dimmed his fame

    All honor to his name!

    This fine old Mason is but one of a large family:
    In every lodge you'll find his kin, you'll find them two or three;
    You'll know them when you see them, for they have their father's face,
    A generous knack of speaking truth and doing good always;
    Reproach nor blame, nor any shame, has checked their course or dimmed their fame -

    Freemason is their name!

    Ah, many an orphan smiles upon the kindred as they pass;
    And many a widow's prayers confess the sympathizing grace;
    The FATHER of this Brotherhood himself is joyed to see
    Their works -they're numbered all in Heaven, those deeds of charity!
    Reproach nor blame, nor any shame, there check their course or dim their fame -

    All honor to their name!
     
  12. bofahs

    bofahs Registered User

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    I think that, if you are constantly concerned about your own qualifications as a Mason, that pretty much qualifies you as a Mason.
     
  13. towerbuilder7

    towerbuilder7 Moderator Premium Member

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    I AGREE, WHOLEHEARTEDLY, BROTHER. Brothers are quick to quote the phrase, "It's about the internal, not the external". When doing so, in my opinion, we should make a self assessment for how we are living according to the principles of our GAOTU. If what we do and how we live is congruent with the Scripture, and/or principles of whichever VSL you embrace, then you will be "Square and Upright in your deeds and actions". That's not to say that you can't enjoy some good old fashioned fellowship at a Tailgater, or around a BBQ with friends; however, do we put our priorities in line with what GOD wants for us?? If we do so, then one can look at the Compass and Square as a simple reminder of our obligations, and maintain that walk each day. I think it's MORE IMPORTANT to be mindful of our behavior in the world outside of the Lodge, because everything we do, good or bad, will be tied in to your image and reputation as a Mason. just my two cents.......... Bro. Jones
     
  14. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

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    So, Porter, your thoughts on the issue?
     
  15. Frater Cliff Porter

    Frater Cliff Porter Premium Member

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    Well like I said Brother. It is something I contemplate, but wouldn't say that I have made up my mind. I think I lean on the idea that the being a true Mason requires a daily life lived as such and that simply having a dues card would not entitle a man to being considered a Mason.

    That being said, when a stranger, who is a Brother arrives at the lodge he is treated as he should be...a Brother until his actions or such proved him otherwise.
     
  16. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

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    Well, I've always found that if I expect someone to act a certain way, they have a tendency to more readily lean in that direction. If I expect someone to be a miscreant, they generally lean that direction more easily as well. I have some funny stories regarding personal experience on both sides of that one, but that's one for whiskey and cigars :)

    That aside, I think we can have a higher expectation of someone that walks around carrying the card than of someone that doesn't. Not 100% true, but it's the same with any organization.
     
  17. T.N. Sampson

    T.N. Sampson Guest

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    Aren't you presenting a bit of a dichotomy? That a man has a paidup dues card, he remains, in fact, a Master Mason. Is a man removed from the roles for NPD no longer a Mason?

    I see two main points in all of this: 1. A man completing the 3rd degree and its proficiency is a Mason, and just as much of one as any other man in the Lodge. 2. Inherent in Masonry is the fact that a Mason is expected to obey and live out the tenets of Masonry.

    Most of the discussion on how 'good' a Mason a man is centers on point 2. Cordially, Skip.
     
  18. jvarnell

    jvarnell Premium Member

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    Skip are you a mason? I have touble reading advice from non masons. Ireally like hearing what they think so i can try to reflect a true mason feel on the subject. I am still in the process but i think my color on the process is good.
     
  19. T.N. Sampson

    T.N. Sampson Guest

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    No, I am not, but I have spent about 20 years on the subject as a part of my personal ministry work and am pretty well-read on the topic. As to reading my advice, I'd suggest you hold me to the same standards you would hold a fellow Mason.

    In my commentary, I try to base my views on authoritative Masonic documentation, such as that published by the GL, and that by very knowledgeable Masons (e.g., Coil, Roberts). I also prefer to do my own research, and not depend on the commentary of others. Cordially, Skip.
     

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