EA work

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by crono782, Dec 19, 2012.

  1. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    I've finally gotten together with my mentor and started on the work for my EA. Question: I hear a lot of people saying "study every day and you'll get it". Hah, how does one study daily? The only way I get the information is from my mentor directly whom I'll only meet with a couple times weekly at best, so I just have to keep running through it in my head over and over or I lose it. Do some jurisdictions give out homework or something that we don't do in Texas? Just making sure I'm not missing something. It seems overwhelming the amount of stuff to keep straight.

    I do find myself catching on little by little at least, so that's good.
     
  2. timgould

    timgould Registered User

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    You are right on target. Study daily is to repeat it to yourself daily. Mastering what you do know so that the new additions can be freshly taken in. Rote memory is constant repeating until it comes almost without thinking. Hang in there, you're doing it right!
     
  3. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Im lot sure about the states but up here, craft lodges give out a book of the degree work which has the proper things to study. My problem with it is that it's abbreviated, which makes it a bit more difficult to study, but I emailed mu secretary and he gave me a full version of the OB and questions for the degree I was studying
     
  4. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Far as I know, there are no materials given to study. It's spoken word only.
     
  5. Zack

    Zack Registered User

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    It, the catechism, are the directions for the work an EA is to do. Memorizing is the beginning not the end. IMO.
     
  6. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    You guys don't books on the work?
     
  7. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Apparently not? My understanding is that I meet regularly, the work is given verbally, remember as much as possible. Lather, rinse, repeat until I have it all memorized.
    Understand, I'm entirely ok with this approach. In fact, I find the challenge fun personally. I just want to make sure I'm not missing an important step. haha
     
  8. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Doesn't seem like you are. But if your having trouble inquire if they provide the tools to help you along.
     
  9. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Thanks. Too early to tell really. I'm told all the old codgers that came before me did it this way, so it can't be that bad!
     
  10. karlosuk

    karlosuk Registered User

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    Work on one section at a time/ per visit. Ask to learn the most difficult first as this will take the longest to learn so it rolls off the tongue and there for you have the longest time with it. Then the second most difficult e.t.c.
    Repeat the section you have learned that day constantly until you go to bed and when in bed run through your entire section/s learned a few times and they will soon rattle off the tongue. I found it helpful to actually whisper the words and that way the mouth learns them at the same time as the brain, believe me there is a big difference between knowing something and speaking if smoothly and confidently.
    Don't get down heartened you will learn it and when you do it will stay in there for the rest of your life :)
     
  11. brothermongelli

    brothermongelli Registered User

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    How will your proficiency exam be conducted? is it done privately, or before the entire lodge? and what will you be tested on?
     
  12. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Before the entire lodge as I understand. Not entirely sure as to what all it will entail yet. I do know it is several questions from the ritual and the obligation, but I don't know beyond that. I'm getting it all in measured doses I guess you'd say.
     
  13. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    That's all we do up here.
     
  14. BroBill

    BroBill Site Benefactor Site Benefactor

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    Here's a trick... learn the questions and the answers. It makes self-study much easier. Some instructors require it, but some don't. If you know both parts you can practice whenever you have time to run through it and it will begin to "flow" much quicker.
     
  15. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Yah, it's funny because I can remember some answers, but can't for the life of me what the question was so I forget how it all ties together! hah >.<
     
  16. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    What helped me learn the questions and answers was to attend as many other degrees as I could.

    Most the catechism is a step-by-step retracing of the degree, so keep that in mind.
     
  17. Pscyclepath

    Pscyclepath Premium Member

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    Here in Arkansas, the only parts "proper to be written" is the paragraph or two describing the working tools, and the new candidate is given a small brochure containing that, as well as a few other topics. Everything else is "mouth to ear."

    Proficiency exams are conducted in open lodge, at a stated meeting... or rarely, by a committee appointed by the Master. When I went through, my schedule didn't allow me to attend stated meetings regularly, so a degree night was scheduled, I was examined in open lodge, then chased out while they set up for the degree immediately afterwards, a so-called "examine & confer" called meeting.
     
  18. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Same story in Texas. No hard and fast rule on questions and answers. I've seen it go both ways. My home lodge expects candidate to be proficient in all three sections of the EA work, both questions and answers.

    Here's something one should consider when working his way through the degrees. Make a contract between you and your instructor. Tell him you will know well everything he taught you in the last session. Also tell him when you've had enough and can absorb no more. Work with him, if you aren't learning easily the way he is teaching you speak up. Find that grove in which you best learn. Don't get lazy on him. He's spending valuable time away from his family working with you. And finally, know well the work is being passed on to you. You now have a debt to pay. Whether it's teaching the work, mowing the lawn, or keeping the financial books. You owe your lodge. Consider the length of your cable tow and respond accordingly.

    God bless.
     
  19. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    So true.
     
  20. scialytic

    scialytic Premium Member

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    Each jurisdiction is a little different. Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma seem to be similar with the questions and answers. I believe California gives the Brother a hand out with questions that they have to research and turn in (not sure if that is in addition to the Q&A).

    Brother Jones is absolutely correct though. Just imagine going through the degree again and the questions just fall in line after the answers. It seems like a lot (it IS a lot!), but you'll be surprised how being prompted by one word when you get lost will flood back all of the answers.

    It is a lot of work, but when you are giving the lectures in a year, it will seem like you never struggled to learn it. Keep up the good work and call me if your mentor is busy. It will help keep me sharp... ;-)
     

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