Freemason college clubs?

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by gnarledrose, Feb 10, 2012.

  1. gnarledrose

    gnarledrose Registered User

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    I've heard of some colleges/universities having "Square and Compass" clubs or "Acacia clubs"-- A college-level way for people who are maybe interested in the fraternity to find out more about it in a relaxed manner; or, a way for Masons who have moved away from home to go to school to be able to stay in touch with Masons.
    Does anyone know of a specific club, maybe in your area? A couple of us are trying to get one started at the local college, and was wondering if anyone knew of a successful Freemason club that would be willing to impart some wisdom to us, the less-informed brethren.
     
  2. robert leachman

    robert leachman Registered User

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    Stupid question, but if you are already a MM, why not just go to Lodge on meeting night?

    If you are a MM and know that someone is interested in the craft, get them a petition!
     
  3. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I have never heard of a S&C club at a college. I think it is a terrific idea I started a S&C club when I was in Iraq. I suggest that you check with your Grand Lodge for guidance.
     
  4. gnarledrose

    gnarledrose Registered User

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    Because the purpose of such a club isn't to replace degree work or lodge meetings, but to supplement them. If you're a busy student, and your nights are consumed by homework, a simple meeting during the day, say in the middle of the week, might be all the fellowship you have time for. But wouldn't you rather have that little bit and still remain true to your obligations as a student, than none at all?
     
  5. robert leachman

    robert leachman Registered User

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    Makes sense!
     
  6. Jay

    Jay Registered User

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    :14:I don't know all that much about S&C clubs,But my mother lodge, Stephenville #267, hosted dinners one year for the local college frat houses. One a month for about 6 or 8 months as I recall. We always had a big turn out of hungrey yong men and put out a lot of info. on Freemasonry and had speakers for short talks. Did it help lodge membership grow... Hmmm .. hard to say sometimes a seed takes a long time to sprout, Did it do any good, YOU BET!, It got our members Pump,Got a nice word or two about the lodge in the local paper! and kept some yong guys talking and thinking about something besides school.:14:
     
  7. Michaelstedman81

    Michaelstedman81 Premium Member

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    I don'tk now about S&C clubs, but a while back I was really looking into the Acacia thing. I still am looking at more of the Acacia stuff because I might try to join if I trasnfer to UT instead of UNT. Here is a brief rundown since nobody has posted what Acacia is.

    Acacia is just another "Greek" fraternity on college campuses. The organization was originally founded by a handful of Master Masons, and back then, being a Mason was a requirement to join. As time has gone by a little, a lot actually since it was started in 1904, the requirement to be a Mason to join has pretty much slipped away, though the organization still embraces a "spiritual" tie to Masonry and teaches principles, values, and morals that Masonry teaches. To set the "fraternity" apart from other "frats" on college campuses, and just like Masonry, they hold a high value on character. So, you pretty much won't see these guys out doing those things that you typically see with happening with those hardcore partying jock type frats. Their purpose is focusing on high scholarship and moral character. One of those important to us Masons.

    They have about 34 chapters being spread across the U.S., and one in Canada making it an international fraternity. There are two chartered Acacia fraternities in Texas. One at the University of Texas in UT (Go Horns!), and one in Lubbock at Texas Tech. However, the one at Tech is called a "Colony" instead of a "Chapter". I don't know the difference between chapter and colony, but Tech has the only colony. Kind of curious to know what that difference is.

    All in all, seems like a really cool organization to be a part of. I wonder if there is any kind of issues with GLoT about joining this since there isn't the requirement of being a Mason to join anymore. Also, don't know if they are on the naughty list with GLoT, but I'm sure they aren't. I know that I will be transferring colleges here pretty soon, and which one I choose to go to is still up in the air between University of North Texas (up in Denton, TX) or UT in Austin. If I do end up going to UT, I would like very much to take part in this Acacia fraternity even though I'm not too big on joining a frat really. If I go to UNT, I know that the Masonic membership in that area is high in the numbers, so I would like to try my hand at seeing if I could get a chapter started there at that school. Whether just joining the one at UT or helping bring Acacia to UNT, it seems like being partof that fraternity is something that really enjoy and could happily add to my Masonic life. If anyone knows if membership with them is forbidden, can you please post?

    Gnarledrose, I saw that you were from up there in UT. I did not see a chapter in that state at all. Don't know if that is where you are from or if that is where you are now, but didn't see any kind of Acacia stuff there. Below I will post a link to the Acacia chapter that is from UT in Austin, and also the link to the fraternity's international website. I hope this helps! Good luck on getting something started for you and the rest of the Brethern you are around. Keep us posted on anything that you come up with or do.

    Texas Acacia University of Texas Acacia Chapter
    Acacia Fraternity Acacia International Fraternity Site
     
  8. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    The Grand Lodge of Oklahoma had a "College Fraternity Liaison" program. Men from local lodges, would visit the Greek fraternities on campus, and "talk up" Masonry. The college men, had an understanding of the fraternal "dynamic", and were receptive to Masonry.
     
  9. Bro. Stewart P.M.

    Bro. Stewart P.M. Lead Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    First of all, thank you for the clarification. I had no idea that these types of groups existed on college campuses. My guess is that the MM requirement may have been dropped because of what the age requirement once was in Texas (21), something that may have discouraged a lot of new members back then.

    My (non-legal) thought is this: Knowing how some other groups were treated by GL recently. My guess is that becasue they do not "require" their members to be MM's, then the GL likely does not have any issue with them so as long as none of the ritual is practiced by them. I do know that they are not included within Article 225* as being able to utilize the actual Lodge Room. I am unaware of any information banning the membership of such a group.

    (*) Article 225 / 225a are the closest thing that I can find in the Law Book that relates to any "groups that are recognized or not" by GLoTX.
     
  10. Mac

    Mac Moderator Premium Member

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    I always interpreted the Fellowcraft degree as being inspirational when it came to academics.

    If it's like my college fraternity, the colony is the probationary level that new chapters start at. Once the colony has been established long enough and met all the chapter starting goals, they get bumped up to full chapter status.
     
  11. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    In New Hampshire, most lodges close down entirely for the summer months. Many lodges in NH, sponsor "Square and Compasses Clubs" and Masons set up these clubs, so that they have can have fellowship and picnics/barbecues/family-oriented events in the summer months (and all year round). The meetings are open, anyone can attend. Often, masons bring their friends, and then they are introduced to Freemasonry. When the lodges open up again in September, some of the visitors will express interest in petitioning freemasonry.
     
  12. gnarledrose

    gnarledrose Registered User

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    Utah has traditionally been very.... limited when it comes to fraternities. To be frank, if it wasn't an official part of the LDS church, it hasn't lasted long-- Freemasonry, notwithstanding, still survives. ;) In the past, the LDS church tried its hardest to provide those other extracurricular activities, but lately we've had an increase of people looking for stuff specifically away from their church. Interesting times, to say the least.
     
  13. Michaelstedman81

    Michaelstedman81 Premium Member

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    Yea, that is my thinking as well. Pretty much a way to expand membership at the colleges. Which, I think was a beneficial move to the Fraternity. I'm sure there have been several Brothers who had no real idea about Masonry when they joined Acacia and then decided to make Freemasonry an addition to their lives as a direct result of being associated with an organization that had its roots and principles coming from our Fraternity.

    Bro. Stewart, thanks a lot!


    Ya know, good point. I am going to look a bit deeper into the FC degree now and see if I can see what you are saying. For some reason, the FC degree has pretty much always been one of the least thought about for me. I seem to always think about the EA and MM, so thanks for that comment. For sure some food for thought for me :)


    Thanks for that as well. Since I am still at the beginning of my college career, I am still really new when it comes to college fraternitys. If that is the case with the "colony" thing, I think that it is awesome that Acacia is spreading throughout the country and especially, the state of Texas!
     
  14. Michaelstedman81

    Michaelstedman81 Premium Member

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    It really is amazing some of the differences in how Masonry operates in different geographical areas. I tell you what, though. I don't know what I would do without lodge during the summer months if our lodge closed up shop...lol


    I was kind of curious how it was for Masonry up in Utah with the LDS there. That is good that Masonry has withstood. I can't remember the site that keeps getting posted on here with all the membership numbers, but is Utah one of the states that hasn't seen a real dramatic decrease in membership numbers? If possible, can someone put up a link again to that site cause now I'm curious about numbers in other states as well.
     
  15. Mac

    Mac Moderator Premium Member

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    In the Fellowcraft Degree, we are encouraged to study the seven liberal arts and sciences. This has immediate application for a college student, especially as you complete your lower level courses that aren't major-specific. I remember hating that I had to take Literature and Physics while completing my undergrad prep for pharmacy school, but looking back, I appreciate the experience and the material. It was even nice to recognize the act of lustration in the Illiad. Lustration reappears in the Scottish Rite.
     
  16. gnarledrose

    gnarledrose Registered User

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    Do you mean the Masonic Service Association's census from a couple years back? (Masonic Membership Statistics)
     
  17. Michaelstedman81

    Michaelstedman81 Premium Member

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    Thanks! I didn't even make the connection that at all. :)
     
  18. Michaelstedman81

    Michaelstedman81 Premium Member

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    Thanks, Brother. Yes, that is what I was referring to
     
  19. Brother Mark

    Brother Mark Registered User

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    Hey guys
    Just wanted to say thanks for talking bout this topic. I had no idea there where college groups associated with the masonic lodge. I will definitely be looking in to them when I transfer colleges.
     
  20. ess1113

    ess1113 Premium Member

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    I have always thought that the lode\ge should always be the priority. If a lodge was meeting anywhere close by thats where you belong.

    I also acknowledge that with schedules at school being so tight and you may not have the time to attend, just socializing with a Square & Compass clun beats not having anything. They may also give you more exposure to masons that are closer to your age with the same interest.

    I have never sat in a S & C club but I would be curious as to what goes on. Apparently no degree work so it may be more of an educational experience.

    Anyway, I wish you the best on finding a S & C club closer to your home !

    Eric
     

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