God and Christ

Discussion in 'Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality' started by Blake Bowden, Jul 6, 2012.

  1. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    Is Jesus a Prophet to spread the word, or God in Flesh? What are your beliefs?
     
  2. Kenneth Lottman

    Kenneth Lottman Registered User

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    Oh Lord.... Here he goes again! Lmao!
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  3. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    Have to throw things out to create discussion. I will now run for cover...
     
  4. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    I'll lob in my grenade.
    My belief is that the Word of God (Logos) is the second Person of the Trinity, who is eternally begotten of the Father, and thus the Word is also the Son. Both are co-extant, eternal, from before all ages, and both are fully God. Through the Logos, all things were made. Within time, the Logos took on humanity from the woman Mary, daughter of Joachim and Anna, and Mary bore God within her womb, making her the Theotokos. The Logos thus, within history, became both fully human and fully God.
     
  5. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    I believe Jesus was a man - who like the Buddha and Socrates said many wise things and wrote nothing. Some of the exact same things.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2012
  6. cog41

    cog41 Premium Member

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    He is the Eternal Son of God, God Incarnate, the Creator, the Beginning and the End, Alpha and Omega, Wonderful Counselor, The Great Emmanuel, The Resurrection and the Life........
    He was born of the virgin Mary, fully man yet Fully God. He honored and fulfilled the Divine Law, and through His substitutionary death on the cross made provision for man's redemption. He was raised from the grave, ascended to heaven and there He sits at the right hand of the Father waiting for His rightful return to earth.


    You asked.
     
  7. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    "Is Jesus a Prophet to spread the word, or God in Flesh? What are your beliefs?"

    Incoming!

    I hope the server can handle this load Brother Blake ... I truly do.

    You ole :sneaky2:'y brother.

    :40:



    Any Rosicrucians in the crowd?

    With of course, a good dose of deism somewhere in the mix?
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  8. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    If I hug the tree tight enough maybe they'll miss me entirely ;)



    *nods, I'm yer huckleberry. Franklin + Thoreau, or thereabouts.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2012
  9. Traveling Man

    Traveling Man Premium Member

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    or Baha`i ?
     
  10. VHN5150

    VHN5150 Registered User

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    I actually just did a study on the Trinity with my ministry.... ;)
    Great post, as I think it's good for brothers to share there thoughts with one another.
    I Have faith that Jesus is the Son of God, the second part of the Trinity, God in the flesh, and the only way to the Father. If Christ were only a prophet, it would be written as so in the Bible.
    A prophet simply can not make the promises Christ made... only God can guarantee those promises, and carry them out.
    The prophets prophesied his coming...
    God bless Brothers!!
     
  11. Frater Cliff Porter

    Frater Cliff Porter Premium Member

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    Why can't he be both?

    Just for the sake of discussion....when we read the canonical gospels we find Jesus reportedly referring to himself over and over again as the Son of Man....and provides evidence in some of his first miracles in the Gospel of Mark that it is the Son of Man who has power to forgive the sins of our world.

    Maybe a better question is are we truly paying attention to the lessons of the Son of Man and trying to live those in our lives, or have we subscribed to a dogma that he, the Son of Man, never desired in the first place.
     
  12. SeeKer.mm

    SeeKer.mm Premium Member

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    I believe that God is the Creator and goes by many names. I believe that Jesus is the Son of God, the ransom for our sins by living a perfect sinless life as a human (Where Adam failed Jesus didn't , and is now the path to the Father. I believe the Holy Spirit is the means through which God touches us here on Earth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2012
  13. sshevlin

    sshevlin Registered User

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    I am in the prophet belief area
     
  14. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    --C.S. Lewis, ​Mere Christianity
     
  15. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    He is fully human, of course, but that does not preclude His Divinity, either. "Son of Man" is a poetic construction that usually meant "humanity". At that time, it would have been a common risk for people to completely deny His humanity. Instead, they would claim that He merely had the "appearance" of being human. This was the belief of the Gnostic Christian syncretists, such as the Marcionites, the Bogomils, and the Cathars. So, yes, He is both. He is a great teacher and He is God. We follow Him for his wisdom, but we worship Him for His healing power. Our worship of Him is not for His benefit, it is for our benefit.
     
  16. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Agreed! Agreed! Dogma is a terrible thing to perpetrate!

    Why do we continue to make the same mistakes and keep ourselves apart?
     
  17. Plustax

    Plustax Registered User

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    ask a Morman & get another completly different view.....
     
  18. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    I usually edge away from a conversation about this sort of topic when I catch words like "foolish" being used, even in a quote. I'm sure I'm not the only one. There is just too big a chance someone will become defensive or take what I say the wrong way if they believe that what I say is such.

    But I'll say one more thing on it and leave it be. There is a whole ocean between accepting the Bible as literal truth and believing Jesus was a madman. Only the fundamentalists (which Lewis was, by the way) want it the other way, because it makes it a binary choice for the faithful. Our way, or no way.

    There are many, many things which all men of intelligence believe is allegory or exaggeration within the Bible. If you haven't found an example of it, you simply have not read the entire text through, or it has been too long a period since you have. The Old Testament has bunches, stoning your kids, a mortal sin to have tattoos and that sort of thing. Every man makes some choices about those sorts of things and draws the line somewhere. Chances are every man draws it in a different place than you do, whether they attend the same Church you do or not, and whether they proclaim themselves Christian or not.

    In my opinion, the biggest thing to resist is the notion that you have it right and other people have it wrong. Some sects of all the major religions teach this and have for centuries. That is the most dangerous bit, it is a sign of fundamentalism. You can think of examples readily in the present day I would imagine of how that looks when it goes bad, but the way it manifests itself in its lesser form is intolerance.

    I'm more concerned with being like Jesus than the literal interpretation of the words written about him by the men that were close to him - almost a generation after his death and then reinterpreted, edited, and republished under councils of men, translated and retranslated over the aeons, exerpts of which are delivered from the pulpits all over the world, usually to tangentially strengthen a sermon. It is the essence, that to me is important, not the granulars. The essence unites us, the microscope level specificity has the potential to divide. To me it is very clear which is better to focus on.

    S&F
     
  19. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    Lewis was a Roman Catholic, very much so. How would that make him a "fundamentalist"?
     
  20. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    Brother Maloney:

    From Merriam Webster:



    For what it is worth, Lewis was Anglican - known more commonly in the United States by the word Episcopalian. Not Catholic. As it happens, I was an Episcopalian acolyte (Catholics call them altar boys) for most of my boyhood, and for years planned and was expected to enter the clergy. It has many of the customs associated with Catholicism, but there are many distinct differences - especially in terms of governance. There are other major areas too. For example, transubstantiation. Purgatory is another.

    The irony of Lewis is that he is famous for his fiction, which are allegories about faith. But he started out as an atheist, and converts are often some of the most zealous of a sect – and certainly the most often contradictory in that they tend to exude surety in their words. I have found at least that the most sure men are usually the ones who don’t profess to be so, and vice versa – but your mileage may vary.

    But I'm carefully backing away now....:laugh:


     

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