Happy Bastille Day!

Discussion in 'Fun and Notables' started by Jacob Johnson, Jul 14, 2011.

  1. Jacob Johnson

    Jacob Johnson Registered User

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    Happy Bastille Day, brethren!
    <a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GW72Gmqjse4" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GW72Gmqjse4">[video=youtube;GW72Gmqjse4]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GW72Gmqjse4[/video]

     
  2. Bro. Brad Marrs

    Bro. Brad Marrs Premium Member

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    Well, gunpowder is a preferred ingredient in the fight against tyranny; I suppose.
     
  3. choppersteve03

    choppersteve03 Premium Member

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    Well put bro.marrs.
     
  4. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Kinda reminds me of the last time Ole Miss won at Tiger Stadium. Lots of heads rolled that day brother. Lots of heads!

    Yesterday, while fingering over my purple, gold, and green beads and thinking about Bastille Day I got to thinking how many of those folks released were later rounded up and beheaded. Sort of like leaving the door ajar and shooting the runners.
     
  5. Huw

    Huw Guest

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    Hi jwhoff.

    None.

    As it happened, the Bastille was almost empty of prisoners at the time it was stormed. Although the fighting between the mob and the guards cost over a hundred lives, all the attackers eventually succeeded in freeing were four forgers, two lunatics and one pervert. None of them were political prisoners, all of whom had been moved elsewhere a while before because the Bastille was already in the process of being closed down before it was attacked.

    The forgers (Bechade, Lacaurege, Pujade and Laroche) immediately disappeared back into the criminal underworld. The lunatics (Tavernier and de Whyte) were locked up in the asylum at Charenton. The pervert (de Solages) was sent back to his family (even though they didn't want him because his crime was incest). None were executed under the Terror, nor played any role in future events.

    In terms of practical results, the storming of the Bastille was a total fiasco. It's celebrated in France as a symbolic revolutionary moment, because it was a government fortress, not because it was actually significant in itself.

    T & F,

    Huw
     

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