Hiram Key book series

Discussion in 'Recommended Reading' started by widows son, Oct 12, 2012.

  1. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Has anyone read them? I got the set. I think there are some good theories presented.
     
  2. towerbuilder7

    towerbuilder7 Moderator Premium Member

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    I have read them. And yes, the theories presented are worthy of deep thought and introspection. Lomas and Knight put a lot of time and research into these works. There are 5 in the series, if you include Second Messiah and Uriel's Machine. Haven't tackled with of those last two yet; they are still on my shelf. Bro Jones
     
  3. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    I've read all of them. I don't agree however with their theory of the third degree originating where and when it did. Have you any other Masonic books of interest?
     
  4. Frater Cliff Porter

    Frater Cliff Porter Premium Member

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    Hiram Key is my least favorite, book of Hiram my favorite...but the best Lomas book is the simple little red one on initiation.
     
  5. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    What's the title?
     
  6. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Also I agree that book of Hiram is the best
     
  7. Frater Cliff Porter

    Frater Cliff Porter Premium Member

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  8. SeeKer.mm

    SeeKer.mm Premium Member

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    I am currently reading the Hiram key...pretty decent so far...I read Born in Blood too..different author but a good read nonetheless
     
  9. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Hiram key is not bad, second
    Messiah and Uriel's machine are better tho, the theory of the third degree in the Hiram key I dont agree with
     
  10. promason

    promason Registered User

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    agree with widow son!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  11. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Lol. The information on certain astronomical data is quite interesting and how they coincide with monuments etc. the authors seems to have a good supply of documents and other modes of information readily available to them.
     
  12. Tony Uzzell

    Tony Uzzell Registered User

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    I felt The Hiram Key to be a very good work considering the amateur nature of the writers when it came to historical research and writing. Most with historical training would never have made the leaps of faith they did in some of their suppositions. One of the first things you're taught when working on a history degree are the differences between logical reasoning and logical fallacy, which their theories (at least in THK) were rife with. You also learn that one historical source is not enough to prove veracity, but that's somewhat ameliorated by the thought that perhaps the ideas were so "secret" that they only appeared in a single historical source (also the oral-aural manner of Masonic teaching works against researchers here as we'll).

    I have not read their further works, although I've heard the Second Messiah is very good as well. I'll probably look into picking it up in the near future, particularly if I can find it set up for the Nook.

    TU



    Sent from my iPad while I'm rocking' with Tapatalk.
     
  13. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Well put brother. I think all their books are worth a read mason or non mason
     
  14. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Speaking of, since I'm not yet a Mason, can y'all recommend some good books to read that won't spoil any surprises? ;)
     
  15. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    The secret teachings of all ages by manly p hall
     
  16. daddyrich

    daddyrich Registered User

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    The SecretTeaching of All Ages by Manly P. Hall changed my life. I still keep a copy, the oldest one I can afford, close at hand..
     
  17. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    I thinking of getting the ebook of that one to start. $19 for an ebook is pretty steep though. Gotta check around.
     
  18. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Nothin beats a book though, the man hours put into it, just seems to easy on a ebook
     
  19. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    i agree wholeheartedly. i'm a real sucker for vintage/antique books especially for my office. i would really dig a hardbound copy, but i also like having an ebook on hand that i can pull up on my phone or tablet anytime during breaks at work and other ummm... times reading material is warranted. :D
     
  20. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    This is a copy of Morals and Dogma from 1963. The pages are faded to a light brown yellow, and it smells like an old library.
     

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