How old is to old to join ?

Discussion in 'Frequently Asked Questions' started by jermy Bell, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. jermy Bell

    jermy Bell Registered User

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    Before you tie me to the goat, let me explain. The last 3 E.A degrees I've attended were gentlemen in their late 70s. The last one was 75. They could barely walk, couldn't kneel or stand for the lectures. And can't repeat the obligation. One I attended had the master confused by the 2nd paragraph.Now mind you these are E.A'S and you know what comes at the end of the 3rd........... I had brought this up at the petition reading, and I got, we'll it's been a life long dream. I'm thinking they won't come back after being raised because they can't make it up the stairs. (By the way I'm almost 50 and was raised 5 years ago) but it almost embarrassing to watch. Any thought ?
     
  2. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    It is certainly a long wait for a life long dream!

    For good or ill, Freemasonry has been primarily a social, rather than a spiritual organization for the last century or more. That being the case who are we to promote standards suited to previous times?

    I recall a scene in the Bhagavad Gita where Krishna is asked about a person that starts meditation and then gives it up. Krishna replies that in his next incarnation the person will take his spiritual development very seriously. Perhaps social Masons will do likewise.
     
  3. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    dot·age
    /ˈdōdij/
    noun
    1. the period of life in which a person is old and weak.
    It's probably depending on his physical shape. I have a 71 yr old, Vietnam Vet uncle that played college football, still jogs, climbs trees with his grandkids, goes down a zip line he made etc. (MM for over 40 yrs btw) whereas some people dont age so well. I met Joe Frazier before he died and he was about 60 at the time. The man couldn't talk clearly at all and had a walker to help him get around. Not a cane, a walker. He may have actually been less than 60.
     
  4. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    An ol mn in dtg....if it just said "an ol mn." That'd be different I suppose.
     
  5. Mark Stockdale

    Mark Stockdale Premium Member

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    You may be right that they won't come back after being raised, but there is the chance that joining the lodge and the interaction with the brethren will reinvigorate them.

    In my travels around our province, I've seen many brethren in their 70s, 80s and even a few in their 90s all of whom are active in their respective lodges. There's even a brother being presented with a 70 year jewel at our PGL communication this coming weekend.

    Sent from my 6055P using My Freemasonry mobile app
     
    Bloke likes this.
  6. jermy Bell

    jermy Bell Registered User

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    No, there's a difference between being a mason for 70 years and becoming one at 70 + years old.
     
  7. Suleiman

    Suleiman Registered User

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    Greetings..
    why is that in Our country the game is otherwise?,wise gentle men seeking membership are being discouraged,it seems like masonry membership belongs to assatain group of idviduals?like those with a high living standards without knowing good and young men who are even better to perform all that involves in initiattion and even much commited in averything that involves masonry.
     
  8. jermy Bell

    jermy Bell Registered User

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    Ok, so you will admit a man that can not at least make his way around the lodge at least once and can't repeat anything spoken to him one word at a time slowly ? And helped through their cataclysm ? If you are that desperate for new members I would say good for you. It would be better to save them the embarrassment. I wouldn't care if they was a billionaire or penniless.
     
  9. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    What country is that? Turkey ?
     
  10. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    On the issue of Age - if they knock and are fit to be Freemasons- let them in.

    I have heard of a 90 YO becoming a Freemason in a Lodge local to me. I am yet to met him.

    However I have met an 82 year old who will become a Brother in May (after an 18 month journey). Watching him in the South last Dec, becoming a Freemason is completely the right thing for him to do.
     
    Adrian Martinez likes this.
  11. Winter

    Winter Premium Member

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    There is no "right" answer. If the Brothers of the Lodge are willing to receive them and they have the moral character required, I would ere on the side of looking them as a long lost Brother finally coming home. Sure, they are unlikely to get a 50 year pin. But they may be bring something of value. This is a difficult conversation to have and allow me to be the devil's advocate for a moment. It's easy to tell a candidate they are not suited to being an initiate if they are an atheist or a felon. But what do we tell the octogenarian or a quadriplegic? Where do we draw the line for a new petitioner who is otherwise a just and upright man but is closer to the end of his life than the beginning or one who cannot walk at all?

    And there's James, as usual, to insult all the Masons who aren't him! lol Thanks for chiming in as usual.
     
  12. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Some various thoughts:

    You seem to indicate that you were aware of these issues at balloting. I would suggest then was the time you could have cast a negative ballot. You did not. He is now your brother.

    So what if he can’t repeat the memorized part of ritual known in your jurisdiction as catechism? What does that have to do with being a good mason?

    May I ask, who determines proficiency in your GL?
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2019
  13. jermy Bell

    jermy Bell Registered User

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    No, this wasn't at my lodge. This was a lodge I am a honorary member. I can't vote. But can ask questions.
     
  14. jermy Bell

    jermy Bell Registered User

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    At my lodge we have 3 grand lectures
     
  15. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    I would prefer an 80 year old who could barely walk but was a gentleman, wise, interested in the Craft and into its esoteric aspects etc than some of the d-bags I've met in lodge in their 30s, 40s and 50s.
     
  16. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Thanks. I misunderstood. So, if it isn’t your lodge, why are you concerned?
     
  17. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    As a caveat, this is relatively rare but leaves me shaking my head every time I meet one or see them being a jerk/unmasonic to others.
     
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  18. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Agreed
    Sad. One of the greats in his prime.
     
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  19. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    Brother, was he ever. Had he fought in a weaker era he may be even more highly regarded ie Tyson. But for Christ's sake, very few could have survived an onslaught by Ali or young Foreman. Ali got him twice and Foreman destroyed him twice if I recall.
     
  20. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    I get that, but one might ask if you would have an interest in a felon being admitted in a lodge in your jurisdiction in a lodge you were not a member of.. but I can hear your answer, that one is against the Const. and the other is not. fair enough lol
     

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