If your lodge has a Texas historical marker...please respond

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Scotty32, Sep 2, 2009.

  1. Scotty32

    Scotty32 Registered User

    160
    6
    0
    Our Lodge has kicked around the idea to have a historical marker placed on our lodge building over the years & now I think it is now or never...once again.

    I am currently reading the rules right now & I need extra input.

    Those who have had a marker placed on your building, I need to know was it a good move or bad. There have been reports that if we do it, we can no longer alter the building or do repair work without the Tx Historic Commission's approval.

    Any good reports or horror stories would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

    5,675
    946
    113
    We have a historical marker on our house in town, and you are correct, you cannot change or alter the appearance. That being said, it was put on there in the 1960's so I don't know the process of getting one. I think you have to write a paper or something regarding the historical significance of the building.
     
  3. JTM

    JTM "Just in case" Premium Member

    2,353
    25
    38
    btw scott, i'm on the historical commission for the city of college station. i know all the folks in BC and bryan that might be able to get it for ya'll.
     
  4. Scotty32

    Scotty32 Registered User

    160
    6
    0
    Blake,
    Does that go for the inside of the place as well? Also, painting and everything else?
    We have a front room in the building that we are aiming at turning into a library or museum sort of thing. That room is in serious disarray & we have to re-build it. I assumed before from reading the rules that all of that would come to a halt. We are trying to do our best to keep the nose of the city out of it because they are trying to turn downtown Bryan into the strand in Galveston.

    The outside of the building has not been altered much at all. The only thing major that was done was replacing the 2nd story windows. We are currently trying to do some work on the outside of the building to get it restored and the growing fear is that if we do this, we do not want the state telling us what we can & cannot do with our building that we have privately owned for nearly 100yrs.
     
  5. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

    5,675
    946
    113
    As far as I know, you can do whatever you want on the inside. You could paint it bright pink if you want, ya just have to keep the exterior as original as possible.
     
  6. C_Cabra

    C_Cabra Registered User

    67
    1
    0
    Onion Creek #220 has a historical marker. You might be able to ask someone over there what the pros and cons are. I know there are restrictions on making changes on the inside as well but I am not sure how restrictive they are.

    One thing I do know is that you can't lock gates or anything like that once you have a historical marker. We get "lovers" and other "ne'er do wells" pulling into our parking lot to "do thier business" and get surprised that someone is there on degree nights. I can only assume that they have free reign on nights we do not meet. We find nasty sorts of things lying about. The lodge is secluded with a private drive and surrounded by trees.

    I haven't been to lodge in a while but Raul is a member here and could probably shed more light on some of the issues with getting the historical marker.
     
  7. nick1368

    nick1368 Registered User

    484
    1
    0
    keep us posted on the process....
    how old is your lodge building?
     
  8. Scotty32

    Scotty32 Registered User

    160
    6
    0
    Thanks Cabra, I will do that.

    Nick, Our cornerstone was laid in 1910 and the building was completed in 1912.
    I have photos up in the thread Titled "Brazos Union then & now" under masonic media.
     
  9. Sirius

    Sirius Registered User

    580
    8
    0
    My Lodge here in Louisiana in on the Federal Register of historic places, or something like that. Point being, we recently found out we qualify for a healthy amount of federal $ for renovations, so being a historic place can have it's benefits.
     

    Attached Files:

Share My Freemasonry