Investigation questions.

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by ncm_pkt, Dec 31, 2009.

  1. ncm_pkt

    ncm_pkt Registered User

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    :SNC: Hello brothers! What are the usual questions that you like to ask when conducting an investigation on a candidate? Thanks! :SNC:
     
  2. webstermason

    webstermason Registered User

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    If he is married, I ask the Mrs. how receptive she is to him being out 2 nights a week, while he's learning his work or seeing degrees. Or if he has young children and they are involved with sports, Scouts or even school, is dad being away going to be a concern? If the family has a problem, then there might be a Problem!
     
  3. ncm_pkt

    ncm_pkt Registered User

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    someone had once recommended I ask for the candidates employer's name their phone number. This way you can ask the employer about the candidates conduct. Another good one, IMO is asking the candidate if Masonry is something they want to TRY OUT or if it's something they REEEEALLY want to be apart of.
     
  4. JEbeling

    JEbeling Guest

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    No .. ! don't ask like act like a policeman... ! just ask him where he works... ! if he gives you the rest fine.. if not go on.. ! some questions I always ask is why he wants to be a mason.. ! are other family members in the lodge.. ! I always contact those family members.. ! they understand what your doing.. ! try to answer any questions he or his wife has about masonary.. ! make him feel welcome.. ! glad to have him.. ! try to go as a group.. its less presure on you to ask the right question.. !
     
  5. JBD

    JBD Premium Member

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    My first questions are NOT to the candidate, they are to the members who toplined or signed his petiton. THEN I go talk to him, At his house is best, with the spouse therr is ideal. My questions are the ones on the investigation form (for starters) then I let them tell me their story. You learn more by listening than by talking.

    Remember in an investigation you have NO obligation to the candidate and EVERY obligation to the Lodge, you are guarding the West gate. I would most certainly stay away from the employer angle, You dont know who you could be talking to nor what the intermal company politics could be. That action could cost the guy his job.
     
  6. ncm_pkt

    ncm_pkt Registered User

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    That's true JBD...refering to the politics within the employers company. I probably won't use that question then. This is good input though! I'm glad I asked this now.
     
  7. Payne

    Payne Registered User

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    I'd say meet with him at his home, My first question would be Why do you want to be a Mason? Second question would be to his spouse. If your husband joins would you mind him being out a few times a month and would you attend lodge functions with him. Also maybe knock on his next door neighbor's door and ask about him.
     
  8. kmfisher1

    kmfisher1 Registered User

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    If he has a dog, watch how he treats it. If he has a cat, ask why. Just kidding...

    This actually is the most important job a Mason can do.
    Remember the petitioner is also investigating us too, if even just a little.
    For this may be his first exposure to the Brethren at large.

    I always try to make sure he asks as many questions as on his mind and try to make him and his
    Family feel comfortable with us and Masonry.
     
    Last edited: Jan 4, 2010
  9. kcir

    kcir Registered User

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    I also like to find out a little bit about his financial situation. It is not important to have a great deal of money to be a Mason, but being a mason does ask for charity donations, meals at the lodge, perhaps a new suit for his passing. If participating in Masonry would put the family in financial stress, then I would back off.
     
  10. webstermason

    webstermason Registered User

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    We had a candidate back out at the last minute because no one told him how much it was going to cost. Are we investigators obligated to explain these costs to him at our meeting with him?
     
  11. MGM357

    MGM357 Registered User

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    The canidate should be aware that each degree cost a few dollars. Make sure to let him know that it's not all at once. I don't agree that his financial situation should be a major factor. The canidate should show some financial responsibilty. But worldly wealth or honor is not a requirement to be a Mason.
     
  12. Zack

    Zack Registered User

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    Quote Originally Posted by webstermason View Post
    We had a candidate back out at the last minute because no one told him how much it was going to cost. Are we investigators obligated to explain these costs to him at our meeting with him?


    Yes, I think so.
    While "worldly wealth" is not a prerequisite to join the Fraternity, finances are a reality and most likely the petitioner won't ask about them. When on an investigation committee, besides the usual questions, I inform the petitioner that the fees for the degrees are $$$, the dues are $$$, from time to time he will be asked for donations for such and such. Is this a problem? Dues and fees are what they are. If it is a concern, perhaps he should find a Lodge that fits his finances better. I also tell him that some demands will be made of his time while he is progressing through the degrees. Also that some memorization is required of him. Is this a problem? If he can't find an hour or so a week to spend with his instructor, perhaps he should wait until his time restraints improve. If there are any dress requirements, I inform him of that also. I try to eliminate any uncomfortable surprises.
     
  13. jonesvilletexas

    jonesvilletexas Premium Member

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    My first question to the candidate is why do you won’t to be a Mason?
     
  14. kcir

    kcir Registered User

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    I am not sure that you are obligated as the guidelines for investigating should be issued by the Master of the lodge to the injvestigating committee. The more information that you can provide a candidate the more likely you and the candidate will beable to decide the proper course of action.
     
  15. RedTemplar

    RedTemplar Johnny Joe Combs Premium Member

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    Brothers, I would like your input on this idea as some of you may have tried this in the past. My lodge, for some time now, serves a meal before each meeting. Sometimes it is a light snack while at other times it may be a full blown dinner. Anyways, as part of the investigation process, do you think it would be appropriate to invite the petitioner to a "get to know each other" dinner? This could possibly give the lodge as well as the potential candidate a lot of information to base a decision. What are your thoughts?
     
  16. david918

    david918 Premium Member

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    Sure in Wharton the potential petitioner almost always joins us for a meal before he turns in his petition
     
  17. MGM357

    MGM357 Registered User

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    Without a doubt, it gives the Lodge members as well as the future canidate a great oppurtunity to get know each other. There have times I have voted on a canidate and not known who he was, except what the comittee had reported.

    But at least one of the comittee members should visit the canidate's home and meet his wife ( if he has one). I was also told that the three (used to be five) brothers who signed his petition, should be contacted.
     

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