Language and the Mason

Discussion in 'Masonic Education Repository' started by jonesvilletexas, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. jonesvilletexas

    jonesvilletexas Premium Member

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    Language and the Mason

    For one entering Masonry there are many challenges, but none more immediate than learning a catechism couched in a language rooted in the Middle Ages. Not only are the words unfamiliar and the phases awkward, but the meanings are obscure and difficult in modern usage. Nevertheless, there are lessons within these challenges that are most important to being a Mason.

    In the charge to the Master Mason there is the statement that "in the character of a Master Mason, … correct the irregularities, … and guard them against a breach of fidelity. To preserve unsullied …the reputation of the fraternity …" Later is found
    "Your virtue, honor, and reputation are concerned in supporting, with dignity, the character you now bear." Surely there must be a shorter and easier way to convey the message, or perhaps there is a deeper lesson.
    Saying the words does not mean one knows the words, nor does it mean one applies the words to their daily living. Actors and actresses frequently learn parts, as do opera singers their arias, without grasping the meaning of what they say. They say the words, but do not "live" them. But Freemasons are expected to go beyond the words and meanings, and make them their rule and guide.
    We know that one of the Perfect Points is the hand, especially when aiding a Brother. The phrase, "lend a hand," is understood by many to mean "help," when possible. But to the Freemason, this "hand" extends to more serious and important acts of support. We are to preserve the "reputation of the Fraternity" which means we are to defend the honor and reputation of the character of its members. A serious Masonic offense is to "traduce, slander, libel or falsely accuse any person." The mere utterance or misrepresentation aimed at defaming the reputation of another reflects upon the Fraternity and its members. Each Master Mason is a guardian of the reputation of the Fraternity and must be attentive to that responsibility.
    So, we are to extend our hand, admonish, and defend. Let none of us speak evil of a Brother, or anyone falsely. Maintain our tongue and be circumspect. Apply prudence, wisdom, and care to building our spiritual Temple, so that we may be void of offense. Thus, we may insure that our character is above reproach and is an example to all about us of what Masonry truly is.
     

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