Mediocrity in Masonry

Discussion in 'Masonic Blogs' started by Bloke, Aug 4, 2016.

  1. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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  2. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    So is mediocrity to be fixed by:

    - high fees
    - good food
    - rigorous ritual?

    A local lodge tried that but only lasted a few years.

    Having a shiny wrapper does not guarantee that the parcel is of any value.
     
  3. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    Thought it was intetesting, I didn't agree with all of it.

    People often confuse value with cost on the supposition that if it's more expensive it must be of value. The value of freemasonry cannot be measured in price or cost, but effect.

    The real message for me was why do we put up with mediocrity, esp when its in our hands to change it at a lodge level.
     
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  4. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    Many have tried to change that but few have succeeded. It is harder than it looks.

    The best effort that I have seen is in a local lodge where the Secretary and some of his kin hold the lodge together and provide a core of good will and brotherhood.

    The Secretary also provides goodwill and brotherhood at the local Sports and Recreation club - just without the ritual.
     
  5. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Exactly! My home lodges dues are only 50 by lodge here in NM is 240(120 FOR MEALS AND 120 FOR ACTUAL DUES) both lodges are very satisfying to me. The other lodge heres dues are slightly higher and no meal...and its all business all the time!

    Sent from my LG-H811 using My Freemasonry Pro mobile app
     
  6. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    I think it is a little sad if that is what you took from the article, because that to me is clearly not at all what it is aiming at. Brother Davis speaks nothing of those three things.
    What he does say is "To be exemplary men, or an exemplary organization, we have to be exceptional in our awareness of who we are, what we are here to be doing, what we know, and how we practice what we know. We have to have the courage to be different from the rest of the crowd—nobler in our expectations and more refined in our state of mind."

    So it's much more about being the best that we can be. By choosing that we won't settle for mediocrity in any of our doings. If we don't what distinguishes us as Masons from any other man?
     
  7. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    Would you like to say how you do that?

    There are so many organizations that promote similar values that that may be difficult to answer in many lodges.
     
  8. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    I think the article gives one possible answer, which is stop settling for mediocrity. Let not be sloppy in lodge, serve bad food, have a lousy meeting and bicker with each other. I don't care if you're in a fancy lodge with tuxedos and incense or a small fraternal country lodge. Be the best at whatever it is you do and do it with passion.

    I beg to differ. Masonry is literally the only organization that practices Masonry, but I think we've often forgotten that. We're no longer proud and unique. We're sloppy and mediocre and that leads to our values and proposition no longer being clear.
     
  9. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    First thing is to talk about what members think might be mediocre about the lodge - they might feel nothing. It takes consensus to build change and the first step is identified what members would like to change. If they think all is fine and you do not, you need to mount an argument around how things could be better and what that improvement would mean for the lodge in the short and long term.
     
  10. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    I can remember 5 or 6 of those meetings at one lodge. Attendance at those lodge nights tends to be low as nothing useful seems to emerge.

    The core problem is knowing what Masonry really is and how to deliver that.

    I recall a friend belonging to another fraternal body who dreamed that their lodge was a soup kitchen. Lots of people came for soup but very few wanted to know how to make it.

    So who knows how to make Masonic soup? (Cue for frivolous remarks)
     
  11. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    I think the core of the problem is leadership - all too often lodges are not well led and that's why nothing much happens... and a lack of "doers"
     
  12. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    So why cannot Masonry make Masons good enough to be leaders?

    That is what we pride ourselves upon. Is something missing?
     
  13. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    My lodges do make good leaders.

    My mentor taught me well
     
  14. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    No problem then
     
  15. Ressam

    Ressam Registered User

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    [Deleted]
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
  16. Ressam

    Ressam Registered User

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    [Posted by mistake]
    I apologize.
     
  17. coachn

    coachn Coach John S. Nagy Premium Member

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    MoreMasonry_01.JPG
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
  18. SimonM

    SimonM Registered User

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    The way I see it is that masonry have several components, all necesssry but none of them are sufficient by thenselves. The fraternal spirit is one such component, the ritual is another, etc.

    The problem is that many brothers focus on one or two of these components and have little understanding for others. If a lodge consists of persons who neglects some of the components the overall experience is diminished even though it might be hard to pinpoint why.


    Sent from my iPhone using My Freemasonry Pro
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
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  19. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    And the word mentor there is key I believe. Especially in the jurisdictions where we have the progressive line there is a real need to mentor, train, evaluate, and communicate with people as they go through the chairs. Masonry seems to be an organization where we for some reason rarely tell the guy what is expected of him in a given chair, we complain if he doesn't do well and then we promote him anyways.

    We need to start having some of the tough conversations and mentoring leaders. Whilst at the same time acknowledging that not everyone is suited for the East. Doesn't mean that someone can't be a good brother after all.
     
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  20. pointwithinacircle2

    pointwithinacircle2 Rapscallion Premium Member

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    It has been well said that: "We are all diamonds in the rough, and our purpose to polish our diamond to it's greatest brilliance. However, what most people miss is that polishing means grinding". Forgive me for saying it, but I have learned that what comes through the west gate of my local Lodge is much less important than what I allow to come through my personal, internal west gate.
     
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