One Day Classes

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Blake Bowden, Feb 18, 2009.

  1. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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  2. jonesvilletexas

    jonesvilletexas Premium Member

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    I am going to give this some thought before making any judgment!
     
  3. fairbanks1363pm

    fairbanks1363pm Registered User

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    this is the same thing that our Scottish rite does except you go through more degrees in the SR. I was interested in the statistics on how many of the brothers stuck around and participated in lodge. We make our guys learn the esotoric work and then many of them dissapear. Ive always thought memory work doesnt make you a mason. I think this has merrit although im glad I did it the way I did it. Brother Blake you are doing a great job with this website!
     
  4. jwardl

    jwardl Guest

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    I do not support it at all. Perhaps it would bring in more members, but at what cost?

    Agreed, masonry isn't ABOUT the memory work -- but it is a traditional part of what we are. If we're to swing in the breeze, what makes us any different than any other organization? Part of what makes masonry different and special is that we stick to our old traditions, and WORK is actually required to join and belong. The memorization prepares us for the real work we begin upon becoming a master mason.

    IMHO, men who join masonry through one day classes haven't joined the fraternity at all. They've joined something that USED to be the oldest and largest fraternity in the world.
     
  5. Bro. Stewart P.M.

    Bro. Stewart P.M. Lead Moderator Staff Member

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    Just call me a stubborn old "younger" goat.

    I believe that every new petitioner should discover the Mysteries of Freemasonry in the EXACT same way that I did, and my Brothers before me. I am one of the ones who is dead set against the removal of the 2nd and 3rd sections of the EA degree as discussed at Grand Lodge, for the simple reason that I worked too hard to learn all those Questions and Answers for some newbie Brother to only be responsible for a 3rd of the information.

    Some of the elder Brothers were suprised of my reaction to the EA lecture discusson of the Grand Lodge. I assume because of my youth. Most were pleased how much respect I developed for the estorical lectures and thier teachings.
     
  6. Jon D. Smith

    Jon D. Smith Registered User

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    I feel like it is a reflection of what has been going on in American across many areas in increasing (and alarming) frequency..."curves" or "balancing adjustments". In order to make things "fair", in order to make things "equal".

    Gentlemen, I submit that this does not make things fair or equal. It diminishes the work of those that work hard to obtain their personal goals and gives the impression to those that enjoy the "free ride" that all of life should be adjusted to make things "fair" for them. These broad statements are made reflecting upon what has been happening in our schools, in our politics, in our jobs.

    This is no way meant to say that nothing good can come from it.
    Certainly there are individuals that would strive to learn the work after being accepted and Raised via this fast track method.
    Certainly there are members that came in via this method that can and probably do make wonderful contributions to our beliefs and their communities.

    It is my postion that if our country, as a whole continues, allows this overall method of "curving" to give those of less desire to work their goals so readily, those that are willing to work hard may (over time and generations) cease to work as hard.
    This would not apply to all however; increasing numbers as time progresses...

    My .02
     
  7. Bill Lins

    Bill Lins Moderating Staff Staff Member

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    According to numerous articles and studies on the subject, Grand Lodges which have "All the way in 1 Day" do not draw or retain members any more than we do. Some years ago, at GM Patterson's Fiat Lux Conference, we heard from a Brother who had become a Mason in a "one day class" in another state. He told us that after seeing how we do it, he felt cheated by how he had been initiated. He wished he had done it the old-fashioned way.
     
  8. Longhorn1rob

    Longhorn1rob Registered User

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    Call me a traditionalist, and I'm much like Brother Stewart. I'm quite young, but I think it would be kick in the nuts to Masonry's ideals for the memory work to be thrown out in any capacity. I recently purchased a Monitor that was published in 1889. Now, in the grand scheme of things, this isn't too long ago, but it IS 120 years. As with modern Monitors, scattered throughout the book are bits and pieces of the memory work. It's dang near word for word with what we have now. To me, this IS Masonry. We are a fraternity of like-minded individuals who are joined together for a common cause, to improve ourselves in Masonry. If we drop these time-tested Q&A, can we even say that George Washington would consider us as his Masonic brethren? Gentlemen, I'm only 18. I'm aware that until quite recently, I would not have been allowed to join the Fraternity, and that this rule was changed in hopes of encouraging new members, and I'm very grateful for that. BUT, this was a change in age requirement, NOT a change in work requirement. I was raised on January 31, and as of today, February 18, I'm halfway through the three sections of EA memory work. Upon first hearing this work, I was amazed and thought that certainly, I would graduate from college before becoming a Master. Now, I'm equally amazed at how fast a mind can absorb information in so short a time, if one so dedicates himself. And THAT'S the real driving point of my perception on this subject. If an entering Mason doesn't want to learn the memory work, then, as many have done before him, let him slowly soak it in over time, and when he's ready, he'll be ready, but let's not take away tried and true tradition for the sake of appeasing us new guys. If this had already been done before I was entered, I'm confident that I would have opted to memorize the work anyway. It's integral. Necessary. It proves one's intentions in joining the fraternity. Without it, any person, whether he be true and worthy or refractory and refusing, can easily be among us. I'm all for exploring new ways to expand masonry, but not at the expense of its integrity. The last thing I want is to doubt whether the new guy in my very lodge is nothing but a note-takin, eaves-droppin, intruder. In my honest opinion, with the removal of the memory work, masonry, itself, dies shortly thereafter. How ironic would it be that in our efforts to attract more brothers, we kill the whole tradition.
     
  9. fairbanks1363pm

    fairbanks1363pm Registered User

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    Do we know that George Washington had to learn Q&A. I know to this day in England they dont. They have a page of code that they turn in. Dont get me wrong brethren im teaching two ea's now and got an A cert a year ago. I love the ritual. Douglass McArthur was basicly made a mason in a day. Do we consider him any less a brother? Not all states require q&a. We still call these men brothers..
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2009
  10. owls84

    owls84 Moderator Premium Member

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    Just going to say I'm not a big fan of it.
     
  11. jonesvilletexas

    jonesvilletexas Premium Member

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    This has been going around for some time now and I believe that there might be a purpose in makeing a man a Mason in one day, for one example, a man going to war, but would be required to finish his work upon returning. I for one fell that by working through the lessons in the three degrees I have learned a little more that a brother that received it all in one day.
     
  12. Wingnut

    Wingnut Premium Member

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    If it were easy everyone would have a S&C. Im not a supporter of "McMasonry". By lowering our standards and our expectations we may temporarily increase numbers, but the cost will be too great. The proficiency isnt just about learning to parrot the words. You should also be learning the meanings behind them. The bonds formed by most instructors and candidates are life long. These bonds are what make good men better, not learning how to repeat the words.

    Learning the words however, does set brothers up for learning the degree work. I learn something new at every degree I witness, and Ive been to well over 100 degrees and participated in most of them in some form.
     
  13. C_Cabra

    C_Cabra Registered User

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    I am against one day classes.

    In certain instances I feel exceptions could be made.

    If I am being perfectly honest the fact that you get all the Scottish Rite degrees in a few days is probably the main reason I did not bother to join the Scottish Rite. Before I became a Mason I had invisioned working my way up through all of these degrees. Working to pass to a 19th degree Scottish Rite Mason for instance. I was very dissapointed when I discovered it was not structured this way.
     
  14. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    Oh, I forgot to add my opnion. Should we allow one day classes?

    NO
     
  15. rhitland

    rhitland Founding Member Premium Member

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    I find the memory work to act as a sail so to speak, to allow me to more quickly and better navigate the Craft for the betterment of my life. The memory work is part of Masonry's directions to assemble your spiritual building, and like all uf us I have put together that toy on Christmas eve or whenever and not followed directions, which usauly leaves a piece or two for me to wonder where it goes. I think the root of the mempry work problem is teacher and the stundent, almost 90% of the time they are 2 generations apart and cannot keep each other intrested so it seems as if your are just going through the motions and there is no real reason for the memory work. This is an outgoing problem though with more and more younger guys joining and having mediums such as this website to express their feelings about the work and hear others, all the while the "older guys" are coming outta the wood works to help and assist their younger Brothers.
     
  16. jwardl

    jwardl Guest

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    I have the utmost respect for our military, but wouldn't support a one-day class even in this instance. A man who is capable of going through the normal process should do so -- no exceptions. IMHO, ramming one through is cheating the craft, every brother who learned the work the proper way, and more importantly -- the candidate himself.

    I'm aware of a candidate who is being put through in this manner, presumably for this very reason, tomorrow -- with the blessing and presence of GM Counts. It is the GM's prerogative to make such a decision, of course -- but I must say, I disagree.

    Anyone aware of this, and what the circumstances/reasons are?
     
  17. eagle1966

    eagle1966 Guest

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    do we want masons or do we want dues payers?
     
  18. TCShelton

    TCShelton Founding Member Premium Member

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    I got all three degrees done on me within a week and a half several years ago for that very reason, on the condition that when I returned, I would give back all the work. When I got back, I gave back all three proficiencies back-to-back-to-back. I think it works fine if you are dedicated to learning it, and a high standard is set.
     
  19. Nate C.

    Nate C. Registered User

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    This is increasingly commonplace in other GL jurisdictions. It is the norm in California, where it seemed going through the 'long form' was viewed almost as a novelty. I think the candidate misses out when this path is taken, but I think jurisdictions should be able to as they deem appropriate.
     
  20. Joey

    Joey Co-Founder Staff Member

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    I agree.
     

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