The Beehive | Symbols and Symbolism

Discussion in 'Masonic Blogs' started by My Freemasonry, Jun 4, 2017.

  1. In this episode of Symbols and Symbols we examine the Masonic symbol of the beehive, a symbol that Mackey, in his Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, calls a symbol of an obedient people. In masonic parlance, the symbol is more recognizable as an emblem industry. The Master Mason degree says of the beehive that it is an emblem of industry, and “recommends the practice of that virtue to all created beings, from the highest seraph in heaven to the lowest reptile of the dust.” Yet, as Mackey explains, the emblem is much, much, more.


    A symbol that Albert Mackey, in his Encyclopedia of Freemasonry, says “was among the Egyptians the symbol of an obedient people”, because, as he quotes Horapollo, “…of all insects, the bee alone had a king,” what we know now to be a queen. Mackey continues “Hence looking at the regulated labor of these insects when congregated in their hive, it is not surprising that a beehive should have been deemed an appropriate emblem of systematized industry. Freemasonry has therefore adopted the beehive as a symbol of industry, a virtue taught in the instructions, which says that a Master Mason” works that he may receive wages, the better to support himself and family, and contribute to the relief of a worthy, distressed brother, his widows and orphans. In the Old Charges, which tell us that “…all Masons shall work honestly on working days, that they may live creditably on holidays.”

    There seems, however, to be a more recondite meaning connected with this symbol. The ark has already been shown to have been an emblem common to Freemasonry and the Ancient Mysteries, as a symbol of regeneration—of the second birth from death to life. Now, in the Mysteries, a hive was a type of ark. “Hence,” says Faber (Origin of Pagan Idolatry, volume ii, page 133), “both the diluvian priestesses and the regenerated souls were called bees; hence, bees were feigned to be produced from the carcass of a cow, which also symbolized the ark; and hence, as the great father was esteemed an infernal god, honey was much used both in funeral rites and in the Mysteries.”

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  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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  3. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    As we know the Antient brethren referred to the lodge as a hive, and when the lodge grew too large the process of forming an additional lodge was referred to as swarming.

    Modern Masonry has lost its former knowledge of the hidden mysteries of nature and science and thus does not perceive the inner nature of bees and their hives but there is still a veiled reference to bees being the source of sweetness and light. This is a reference to the Pleiades: KJV Job 38:31 Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades. In the Pleiades we find two stars known as the Queen that destroys evil (Alcyone) and Bee Face (Merope)

    The relationship of hives to the Pleiades can be tested by meditating next to a cluster of hives - preferably in a forest. Then one may even see the plumb line.

    JPS Tanak Amos 7 :
    Behold, I will set a plumbline in the midst of My people Israel;
    I will not again pardon them any more;
     
  4. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    That might just be hallucinations from the many stings


    Sent from my LG-H918 using My Freemasonry mobile app
     
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  5. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Yeah, really!
     
  6. 88DAM88

    88DAM88 Registered User

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    Other bee related knowledge:

    Ancient Egyptians hail the origin of bees as coming from a tear in the eye of the Sun (Ra or Re).
    This gives them an association with Solar Deity and their honey an association with gold.

    I was told that there are ancient Sumerian texts refer to the Food of the Immortals as "Goblets filled with the sacred blood of trees." Frankincense, Myrrh and Honey; the Food of the Immortals. Trouble referencing that one as of yet, however, it reminded me of the Magi (Magus = The word magi is the plural of Latin magus, borrowed from Greek μάγος magos, as used in the original Greek text of the Gospel of Matthew ("μάγοι"), the Greek magos itself is derived from Old Persian maguŝ from the Avestan magâunô, i.e., a term referring to the Persian priestly caste of Zoroastrianism) present the baby Jesus with Frankincense, Myrrh and Gold . . . perhaps this might have been honey?

    One of the first foods that the risen Christ eats is honeycomb.

    Samsun (whose name refers to the Sun, or Man of the Sun) kills a lion (the zodiacal lion is the house of the sun, when the Sun is in it's strength of Summer) and bees make honey in it's head, which the "Man of the Sun" later eats, giving us some death and rebirth aspects. As well, Samson may be seen to refer to not only a Sun Figure, but perhaps a balance of Sun and moon, Masculine and Feminine (ets) as the tale reflects a regional tale of the Sun and Moon (Sol/Mon, Solomon) god stand on a lion; in an orthostat relief from Herald's wall, Carchemish; 950–850 BC; Late Hittite style; Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, Ankara, Turkey.

    this research also led me to this image: The entrance gate of Iranian Parliament in the mid-20th century. Iran being the seat of the Zoroastrian religion, I find an interesting relevance of the two columns with orbs atop them to be akin to central symbols in Freemasonry, the third central "column" here represented as a gate or entrance , connected by an Arch ("Royal Arch") and an overseeing circle.

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    Spiral out
     
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  7. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    Below we have the Sumerian gods collecting the cone-like fruit of the Tree of Life and putting it into their hand bags.

    Of interest:

    - the gods with wings are artist impressions. The wings indicate that they fly (using craft) and the bird head may be the same or may reflect a bird-face characteristics that still exists in some humans

    - the Tree of Life is looking somewhat like the Jewish Tree of Life. Closer versions are easy to find. The Tree does not grow in the earth but out of a vase or flask. This may indicate that the representation is allegorical of celestial farming (alchemy).

    - Only the food of life is represented here. Where is the water of life used by the Sumerians?

    - the god Ashur/Asar flies overhead and is commonly represented by the all-seeing eye.

    - the image of Ashur was used by Blake in his Ancient of Days



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  8. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Interesting!
     
  9. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    I should have noted that the alchemical elixir of life is commonly reported as blood red.

    "you will have an oil most red as blood, which is airy gold, the menstruum foetens, the philosophers sol, our tincture aqua ardens, the blood of the green lion, our unctuous humor, which is the last consolation of man’s body in this life"
    http://www.levity.com/alchemy/ripfivepreps.html
     

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