True & False Acacia

Discussion in 'History and Research' started by Anon, Jul 30, 2017.

  1. Anon

    Anon Registered User

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    Greetings Brethren,

    Can anyone point me to some information regarding True and False Acacia?
    Where each is used, why each is used , their symbolic meanings etc.

    and particularly why false Acacia is used on Regalia.

    Thankyou
     
  2. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    In Egyptian tradition Osiris and (the widow) Isis were supposed to have emerged from the Acacia Tree (the tree of life). Hence Osiris and Isis were the guardians of the mysteries of life and death.
     
  3. coachn

    coachn Coach John S. Nagy Premium Member

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    The most probable reason: The person creating the art didn't know the difference OR it looked prettier.
     
  4. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    Sort of like how faux fur often time looks better than the real thing. Fake pearls and of course fake uhhhhh...."enhancements" often look better than the real thing.
     
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  5. BullDozer Harrell

    BullDozer Harrell Registered User

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    I think it's a mistake to spend alot of energy seeking out the difference between true & false acacia. In Freemasonry, acacia is just another symbol for hidden virtues and the idea that Life is forever. I hardly see it anywhere mentioned in the 3rd degree legend of Hiram Abiff a certain distinction of a 'real' or 'fake' sprig of evergreen.

    Sorry but it's just not there.

    May I ask what is the basis for this line of inquiry into the Acacia symbol? Why does it become so important especially since there's no historical or legendary mention of 2 types of Acacia in Freemasonry?

    http:// www.sacred-texts.com/mas/sof/sof30.htm
     
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  6. Anon

    Anon Registered User

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    Maybe, but surely there must be a more substantial answer.
    I came across the reference of False Acacia in a photo of some regalia with the caption "Regalia depicting False Acacia"
    I was intrigued by this for no other reason other than the question "Why?"

    The only other reference I found was in the "Freemasons Guide and Compendium" on page 490

    "Of these many varieties only two have a special meaning for us:
    (1) The true acacia, Acacia vera, the Egyptian thorn, one of the varieties of acacia from which gum arabic is obtained; it is a member of the Mimòseæ division of the Leguminòsæ.
    (2) The false acacia, Robinia pseudacacia, of American origin and, so far as we know, not grown in thie East until the seventeenthi century. But it is the acacia that is frequently figured in connexion with freemasonry, and the one represented in the emblems on the clothing of Grand Officers. This false acacia is tile common acacia, or locust-tree, to be found in English gardens and greenhouses, and grown for the beauty of its form and yellow flowers.
     
  7. coachn

    coachn Coach John S. Nagy Premium Member

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    I'm sure there is too. However, a more accurate answer, probably not.
     
  8. goomba

    goomba Neo-Antient Site Benefactor

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    "to be found in English gardens and greenhouses" <--- This seems like the reason for me.
     
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  9. coachn

    coachn Coach John S. Nagy Premium Member

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    We do quite a few funerals where any locally available evergreen is cut up and its pieces are given to the Brothers who attend to place upon the coffin of the departed Brother. Unless you're a botanical or symbolic purist not focusing upon the more important task at hand, no one will say a word against it. We use what's locally available.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2017
  10. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Wow! A subject that I had never heard of.
     
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  11. Brother JC

    Brother JC Vigilant Staff Member

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    In Santa Fe we did a lot of funerals, as there is a national cemetery. The normal evergreen for those is the local juniper. Though we do have an abundance of locust trees (invasive windbreak brought west).
     
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