One-Day classes, What do YOU think?

Discussion in 'The Voting Booth' started by cemab4y, Feb 19, 2011.

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Are you in favor of One-Day Classes?

  1. Yes!

    8.4%
  2. No

    91.6%
  1. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    That's two weeks at a minimum however. There's no reason your lodge can't have a policy that requires candidates to spend more time learning the work for their degree before progressing imo.
     
  2. DoubleL

    DoubleL Registered User

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    When I was inquiring and petitioning about joining I was told that there was a one day class coming up soon and would I like to go that route(I think it might of been a test). I a very glad that I did not, I believe that it would of taken alot away from from what I experienced.
     
  3. amhdive

    amhdive Registered User

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    I am personally opposed to it. I think you lose so much of the early Masonic experiences by rushing the process.


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  4. mfields78

    mfields78 Registered User

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    I have to jump in here. I am a product of a one day class. I took that path only because of my work schedule at the time and it got me involved in my lodge sooner. Since then I have given the obligation in lodge, and studied and presented the EA Exam, and intend to do the same for all degrees. While I agree that a lot is rushed going that method, and I personally feel that the person should go through the degrees step by step to gain the lessons, there are some instances where the one day class is a great option.

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  5. Jackel

    Jackel Registered User

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    Here in Wisconsin we used to have one day classes that we would call Man-to-Mason days. My father recieved his degrees at the last one we had about 7 or 8 years ago. Since then we have gotten rid of them and thank God! The whole motivation behind it was a membership drive. My father to this day describes it as "drinking from a fire hose". I am very against them because in my opinion if someone were to be just given all the degrees at the same time then they lose all meaning. Something given has no value. Something earned and sought after is much more valuable. Not to mention one of the first things asked in the FC is "Has he made suitable proficiency in the preceding degree?"
     
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  6. masonicdove

    masonicdove Registered User

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    As a FC who has just completed his 2nd proficiency I can not see myself going through a one day class for all 3 degrees. There is so much to soak in and to digest that I enjoyed taking time to talk with the SW to really understand what was happening. Plus I have gained new brothers in this process and we have taken time to encourage and strengthen one another. Even now as I go back and critically read about the EA and FC I appreciate the time between degrees.
     
  7. Thegentlesoldier

    Thegentlesoldier Registered User

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    Presently in Missouri we have what we call a C2A. That is a chance to advance. You can get your second and third ~ in the same day en mass, You have to have a first degree for 24 hours before you can do the second-degree. Usually one of the candidates will be the exemplar to go through the ceremony while the others set closely and watch and participate at all obligations and the raising. We have an education officer standing close to them and explaining everything that is going on so they will get the best possible understanding of such a class. Of course the Grandlodge has the authorization to perform a mason-on-site, which is a one day of all 3~s ceremony abbreviated. This is rare.


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  8. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    Is being an EA for 24 hours anymore beneficial than being one for any shorter period? :)
     
  9. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    @Thegentlesoldier: What you describe above is exactly what I hope to never see as a normal routine here, primarily for the reasons @dalinkou says previous to your post.

    I begin to wonder, why such a rush to get the degrees? If it takes a year or two, so be it. If things play out like @dalinkou says (with which I agree) and men cannot properly absorb/apply the degrees to their life in the span of a day, then what is the purpose? The title of the degree? Very contrary to the whole point.
     
  10. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    Its like hypothetically giving someone a masters degree in architecture after paying a fee and watching a presentation. You'd basically be paying for a piece of paper and the right to say 'I'm an architect!'. Of course, you'd be an architect in name only because you wouldn't know where to start when the time came to build a skyscraper.
     
  11. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Using your analogy, what it really seems the mentality is that we do as you say, give them the title after only a cursory education/presentation, but then we expect them to actually become an architect by learning on the job. Sounds a bit backwards, doesn't it? We espouse masonic education left and right, but it's usually after-the-fact education.
     
  12. Thegentlesoldier

    Thegentlesoldier Registered User

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    The candidates that get their C2A do not get as much information out of the degree as they would have if they would've took their time and went through it at a regular pace. Many do not return to the lodge after they get their third degree. It is important to recommend someone that will benefit the Lodge as well as the Lodge benefit them. If a candidate does a lot of work and learning and preparation into becoming a Master Mason then he is more likely to stay involved after he becomes one.
    I think one of the main reasons for doing these classes is if you have several candidates and you want to get them through before the end of the year they could do it more quickly. There is emphasis on the mentor system to help keep in contact with the newly made brother and peak his interest and hopefully keep him involved. Sadly Masonry, like most other organizations, only has about 10% to 12% of their membership that are active.


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  13. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Illinois calls this "Blue Lightning" and has been doing it for years. What changed my attitude was when a brother who had skipped 2nd degrees scheduled at lodge showed up to get his degrees together and then became a regular at lodge. Having been through my degrees, degrees are now about the candidate not about me. A different brother who did Blue Lightning followed me through the line and is now a state officer in Jobs Daughters.

    The important part is the statistics on renewal, attendance and activity in appendant bodies. The numbers I've seen are no different than traditional degrees at lodge. Guys complain that few who come in through classes attend, but that's true of the ones who come in a degree at a time as well. The numbers only matter when compared. When compared the numbers are the same.

    The candidates still need to present their proficiencies at lodge. It's not a reduction in requirements. It's a reordering of the requirements.
     
  14. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    there always exceptions to every situation. I've no doubt some men who were the product of insta-mason days turn out to be outstanding members. something just tugs at the back of my mind and it feels wrong for the long-term health of the craft. cultivating members who chose expediency over time and effort seems like one of those "it seemed innocuous so many ears ago, but bit us in the end" kinda things. sure it bolsters membership by giving more men the opportunity, but then again, we all know masonry is a major time sink. do men who do not have the time to give as well as receive deserve the craft? I do feel all worthy men deserve the light of masonry, but is that mindset going to get us in trouble some day? who can say?

    EDIT: I guess I feel like one day masons should be a rarity much like the "made on sight" mason kinda thing. only done in circumstances where members feel very strongly that Mr. X would really make a great mason, but circumstances pretty much prevent him being able to attend degrees in a reasonable time (like military deployment or, in a case in my lodge, a member got sent to UAE for work for a year). Rather than skipping the degrees w/ the on sight thing, a one day could be done with, like you said, proficiencies to follow afterward. and never done as a "class", but by the actual lodge. I think it then shows great dedication of that lodge to its future brother in need.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2013
  15. Perry

    Perry Registered User

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    I think we should make it harder, and spend more time, studying the degrees and symbolism. Anybody can memorize lines, there was a time when your average members were called Fellowcrafts.


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  16. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, we know that retention from ODCs are about the same as more commonly accepted route...so there's no difference in that aspect aside from the fact that we've made it quick and easy at the cost of cheapening the craft.

    What about men who want to join but don't have the time to receive the degrees in the traditional route? I'd respectfully suggest that perhaps they should join later when they have more time. If they can't make the time to attend the degrees then it's unlikely that they'll have the time to attend meetings either. This means that they are unlikely to benefit from being a mason at this point and the lodge is unlikely to benefit from their membership. Why should we create more masons when nobody really benefits?

    Are there success stories related to ODCs? Sure, but even a broken clock is right twice a day.
     
  17. Perry

    Perry Registered User

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    The GL system is only a container for Freemasonry, just holding the title doesn't make you a Mason. Masonry today is like being in the Lions or Rotary Club.


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  18. hallodge

    hallodge Registered User

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    It has it's pros and cons
     
  19. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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  20. helipilot

    helipilot Registered User

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    At first I was for it. Wanting badly to become a mason. However, after experiencing the degree work and realizing the time required to return a perfect catechism, I personally think everyone should get to MM the old fashion way


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