Tuxedo versus Black suit

Discussion in 'Officers of the Lodge' started by Lowcarbjc, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. Lazza21

    Lazza21 Registered User

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    Morning Dress comes in two grades usually a black jacket and waistcoat (vest in USA) with black and grey stripe trousers. Black frock or tail coats are commonly worn by the more senior Grand Officers. All with white shirt and black tie. The morning dress link shows wedding wear and is FULL morning dress usually worn with a top hat, grey waistcoats are not Masonic. The casual wear :eek: some mention would not gain admission to a lodge over here.
     
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  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    We would love to have you brother!
     
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  3. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Here in the AASR Valley of Louisville coat and tie is the norm as it is at Chapter and Council. It is not a requirement but most do coat and tie at these functions.
     
  4. Classical

    Classical Premium Member

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    In West Texas, morning dress is a Wrangler long sleeved shirt and evening is Ariat.
     
  5. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Thanks for the link. I had never heard the term Morning Dress before but I recognized it when I saw the photograph.

    I like that Masonry is often a dress up club. To me it's a secondary benefit. I now feel natural walking around in a tux. My job doesn't call for formal events but it does call for whatever level of dress the client uses whenever I travel. Thanks to Masonry I know what to wear at the various levels common in offices.
     
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  6. williec

    williec Registered User

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    Excellent choice lowcarbjc
     
  7. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    Macys.com has good deals. Maybe a black suit with bowtie would look ok.
     
  8. flipster

    flipster Registered User

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    At an earlier time, our lodge would pool cash from attending degree work members, and purchase the new mm a tux. I don't know when it stopped.
     
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  9. Canadian Paul

    Canadian Paul Registered User

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    The dress in my lodge is black tie for office-bearers and business suit for benchers. A dark sports jacket or blazer with dress pants are also considered perfectly acceptable.

    I had to get a tux when I first took office and found it much more comfortable and convenient than a suit. No more arguments with my wife about whether my socks and tie matched my suit!

    The Office-bearers in a couple of the older lodges here are encouraged to wear white tie and tails. I had to when I was District Grand Secretary and found it brought on a urge to conduct the Organist whenever he played!
     
  10. flipster

    flipster Registered User

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    My wife and I were hosts of a dinner at our local historical society home museum. The tux came in handy, and added a flair. I have worn it for other events in our community. People notice. Men need a good suit, and maybe a tux if they can afford it. Check with tux rental companies. They sell used ones from time to time.
     
  11. Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776 Registered User

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    Practices and traditions vary with jurisdiction. In my lodge, and others throughout the area a man wears what he normally wears each day. Working clothes are not uncommon. It is what a man is in his heart that counts, not his exterior appearance. We have a young member who works construction. If he had to go home, clean up and change he would not be able get to Lodge on time. Fine person and a valuable member of our lodge despite his unkept appearance. If we forced him to change we would lose him and many others.
     
  12. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    You can, as it has often been done, discuss whether people in lodge should meet in tuxes or jeans. However as soon as you allow each man to wear whatever he wants, you forget why the dresscode was instituted in the fraternity in the first place. Which was to bring every man down on the level and not be able to distinguish the guy in construction from the CEO of the company. That is the reason for the dresscode - so we in fact judge a man by his interior, and not his outward appearance.

    And I have to say that I just don't buy the whole "haven't got time to change" deal. It takes five minutes to put on a suit / poloshirt / clean jeans if you want to. For some reason, this is however just not seen as a priority in large parts of US masonry.
     
  13. hanzosbm

    hanzosbm Premium Member

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    Just for the record, this has nothing to do with why we have dress codes. Every organization or event has a dress code, though not always explicitly stated. Your job has a dress code and it has nothing to do with not wanting to judge someone.
    The reason Freemasonry has a more formal dress code is due to tradition. White tie was, at one time and during the heyday of Masonry, the only acceptable form of clothing to wear out in the evening. Later, it became more relaxed when the tuxedo took its place. Just as with the language we use, our dress codes are simply a matter of tradition.
     
  14. MarkR

    MarkR Premium Member

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    There is no "the dress code" in Freemasonry. Some states have dress codes, some don't. In those that don't, some lodges have them, some don't.
     
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  15. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    I do agree with your statement, but will maintain that one of the reasons why masons have dressed alike was to put them all on the level and remove the distinction on high and low in the profane world. I've not got access to my library here, but will see if I can find some written proof to back up my claim.

    With all due respect I would not look to the US to determine traditions on masonic dresscode. Believe we over here are largely the exception when it comes what to wear in lodge. From my understanding most of Europe, as well South America and lodges in Asia/Australia all observe a dresscode policy when meeting. So with that I feel the statement is correct, but will agree that it is not uniform around the world.
     
  16. Agent 47

    Agent 47 Registered User

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    My lodge in NY under the MWPHGLNY we wear Black Suit or Tux white shirt black bow tie or regular tie. Black shoes and socks, white gloves. I'm speaking of my lodge...
     
  17. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    My house is 15 min from my work in the opposite direction from lodge, my lodge opens at 730, i get off at 700, usually not out of office till 715ish. If i had to drive home then to lodge id be late. Luckilly i work in an office(im an Army recruiter) so I can take a change of closthes with me. However not all people have that luxury. Alos if i show up to lodge in uniform the brothers actually like it. In fact at our officers installation it was requested that instead of a tux that i wear my dress blues with bow tie instead of a dark suit/tux.......also not all brothers can afford a suit.
     
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  18. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Just to clarify, in England a grey waistcoat is not Masonic. It is elsewhere.
     
  19. JJones

    JJones Moderator Staff Member

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    When I was younger and unemployed I bought 2 or three suits from Goodwill. They looked nice, fit well, and, after a trip to the dry cleaner, clean too. A few of them are still hanging in my closet, in fact.

    If it's important enough to a man to get a suit, he can afford it IMO.
     
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  20. chrmc

    chrmc Registered User

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    As another brother has said, if it's important enough it can be done. Suits can be brought in the car, it can be left at lodge. Change can happen in the bathroom, and I'm certain that the WM would probably allow someone to be 3 minutes late if that was what it took.

    Not trying to be cheeky, but I'm surprised how masons all over the world are able to afford the clothes, but also change and dress for lodge, however in the US it is often seen as this impossible notion.
     

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