apron

Discussion in 'The York Rite' started by cambridgemason, Oct 28, 2009.

  1. cambridgemason

    cambridgemason Premium Member Premium Member

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    a recent posting on uniform regulations, I posted a reply on what our turn of the centruy Sir Knights wore as uniforms. One item I left out was the apron, not all jurisdictions and Commanderies wore them and allowed them. Here in Massachusetts they are not part of the uniform regulations anymore, I do not know if they are allowed by Grand Encampment uniform regulations. The Sir Knight apron made in triangle shape came in a few different versions. Other fraternal organizations also used this style apron, such as the Odd Fellow uniform rank, and the Orangemans Black Knights. The most popular apron that may be seen in old photos and on ebay today is that of black velvet, with silver bullion edging on the outer rims of the apron. Some of this version of apron like some baldrics were double sided. During the Order of Red Cross the OLD uniform was slightly different, instead of a Chapeu, one wore the Fatique cap, the baldric in some commanderies was reversed to show a green field with a red cross, and the apron if that Commandery wore one was also reversed to show a field of green with a red cross. The Black side of the Sir Knight apron had a few different emblems on it. The most popular as stated above that is found today is the skull and crossbones. Some of the early aprons had this emblem painted on it with a triangle and at times 12 candles.
    Later during the mid 1800's to around 1900 the skull and cross bones were made out of metal either nickel plated or silver plated, with a brass or metal
    underbase. Some early versions of the skull and cross bones which are highly sought after were made out of coin siver. Prices today for a good Sir Knight apron with the skull and cross bones made out of coin silver can run as high as two to four hundred dollars. I can remember years ago some of the commanderies here in Mass. couldn't give them away, so some were trashed.
     

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