Brother Lodges

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Jamesb, Nov 19, 2010.

  1. Jamesb

    Jamesb Registered User

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    I had a thought the other day while speaking with a brother who is a member of our lodge but also a member of a lodge in the UK (his family home is there) and I wondered what would it take to start a program where lodges do like cities.
    That we could become members of other lodges and they can become members of ours. At most it would be a novelty, but it could promote world wide brotherhood. What do you think?
     
  2. Dave in Waco

    Dave in Waco Premium Member

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    I'm not sure what question you are asking. It sounds like you are asking about duel or plural membership which we have already.
     
  3. Jamesb

    Jamesb Registered User

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    Maybe so, but I was thinking along a deeper connection some how. Maybe it is covered under dual/plural, and I just thought it sounded neat, to imagine every so often a group going or coming to each others lodges and (with GL permisson) doing an initiation of sorts and experiencing their brand so to speak.
     
  4. Dave in Waco

    Dave in Waco Premium Member

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    I think many lodges do something like that now. I know that many of the brothers from Ft. Worth Lodge are also members of Tarrant, almost like they have a double lodge.

    My lodge meets at the Lee Lockwood Museum here in Waco as do 2 other lodges. All 3 of us interact with each other and are kind of our own mini-support system. I know despite not being an actual member, I'm treated more as an honorary member then a vistor and I've been asked to sit in chairs in their lodges before when they needed someone. We also have work nights on Wednesday nights, and the other 2 lodges know and will show up when they are wanting to get in some practice as well. They also will schedule degrees on those nights too because they know we have people there that can perform degrees well.

    And another thing we started doing, I suggested the idea of making every 5th Thursday a family night where everyone can bring their families and we can all just let our hair down and have some fun. Well, my WM liked the idea so much, he decided to make it something for all 3 lodges to take part in as a joint family night.

    Are these things, like you are thinking of?
     
  5. Jamesb

    Jamesb Registered User

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    I am thinking more international, but yes. But I am also thinking (as a group of us may be heading to the UK in 2012) that it would be fun to "show" how we do some things but also that if I were to go back I am a card carrying member etc...
    I don't know, now that I am typing it out the sillier it is sounding.
     
  6. Traveling Man

    Traveling Man Premium Member

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    You don't sound silly, I think I understand completely: Like the International Twin Cities concept where we introduce the cultural differences… I.e. How many U.S. masons really know the concept of the trestle board? How many know the different types of rituals practiced, and where they are practiced or their origination? I think it would be a marvelous opportunity for real Masonic education. I think it’s a great idea.

    If you do go to the U.K. in 2012 you might want to bone up on proper Masonic protocol for addressing the Master and the brethren. It will save you some embarrassment. (The examination is quite different too).
     
  7. Jamesb

    Jamesb Registered User

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    Getting tips from our PM who is a member at the lodge we plan on attending. Should be a kick in the pants
     
  8. Dave in Waco

    Dave in Waco Premium Member

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  9. Jamesb

    Jamesb Registered User

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  10. Dave in Waco

    Dave in Waco Premium Member

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    You could still do something like that, just have to get things set up to begin with.

    For the Texas Masons, I think everyone would need Certificates of Good Standing from their Lodge before going, and I think it would have to be forwarded from our GL to their GL since it spans Grand Jurisdictions. Plus you would need Dispensation from our GM to waive our residency requirements and to either waive the regular meeting requirement to ballot them in plus have a meeting there or you would have to wait until you got back home and have a regular meeting here. And you would have to either collect dues if they are going to be considered Regular Members, or get some dispensation to waive them. And that's without breaking out the Law book.

    Then to become members there, I have no idea how their Law would read on something like this and what all you would have to do there. I don't know if they have a residency requirement or not. Plus I don't know what all is involved in dual or plural membership there.

    It would be something cool to do. One of these days I'm going to visit over there. My best friend's wife is British, and her dad, uncle, etc. are Masons there. I believe her uncle is either currently in the East in his lodge or is the immediate PM. But it is supposed to be a lodge of some note over there. No telling what their dues are.
     
  11. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I have been kicking around a similar idea for some years. I think it would be terrific, if USA lodges could "adopt" a lodge in a foreign country, and provide them with masonic regalia, aprons,etc. I visited a lodge in Moscow (Russia), and they did not have aprons, jewels, etc. Such items are expensive and difficult to obtain in Russia. I contacted a lodge, in Massachusetts, and they sent them a "care" package of masonic items.

    Normally, a Mason in good standing can take out dual and plural membership with lodges in other states and countries. My masonic membership is in Kentucky, and my USA residence is in Virginia. I hold dual membership with a lodge in Massachusetts, and I have never lived in Mass, and I have never even attended a lodge meeting in Mass. Some US Grand Lodges permit their members to belong to only one lodge in their state, but they can join multiple lodges in other jurisdictions. Some US Grand Lodges (Ohio, for example) permit their members to join only one lodge in Ohio, and out-of-state dual membership is prohibited. You should check with the regulations of your Grand Lodge, before applying for dual membership in other jurisdictions.

    I sincerely believe, that an international "brother lodge" program, where USA lodges would "adopt" foreign lodges, and exchange information, and provide material support (lodge aprons, costumes, regalia,etc) would be a terrific way to bolster international goodwill, and brotherly love worldwide.

    (BTW- I have visited lodges in five (5) countries. Most masons in other countries, are fascinated with USA Masonry, and would be delighted to set up a program such as I have described).
     
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  12. js4253

    js4253 Premium Member Premium Member

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    You will also need to make arrangements in advance. From what I've heard they don't like surprise visits and getting permission to visit is not easy.
     
  13. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I have visited lodges in five (5) foreign countries. Visiting lodges, is part of the wages of a Master Mason. My experience, has been that foreign lodges are thrilled to have American visitors. You should obtain the schedule of the meeting, time and place. Plan to arrive at least 30mins before the meeting time, so that you can stand an examination. Most foreign lodges are somewhat formal, wear a coat and tie. (A lodge in Paris, loaned me a tie). Most foreign lodges, when the meeting is completed, adjourn to a tavern or restaurant, for a meal and refreshments, including alcohol.

    You do not need "permission" as such to visit a lodge in Europe, but it is adviseable to contact a lodge member, in advance, and get a take on their protocols, and customs. Most European lodges do not have aprons for visitors, you should bring your own.

    I have visited a German-speaking lodge in Paris, with brothers who risked being sent to concentration camps, because Freemasonry was illegal under the Nazis. I visited a lodge in Moscow,with men who risked Siberia, because Freemasonry was illegal under the communists. The American lodge in Paris, is about 3/4 Frenchmen, who love to socialize with Americans, and practice their English.

    I encourage anyone who is traveling abroad, to make time to visit a lodge, in the countries they visit.
     
  14. grayflannelsuit

    grayflannelsuit Premium Member

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    Was just thinking about this recently, so I thought I'd bump this. I really like the idea of having international Brother Lodges somewhat similar to Sister Cities. Being that it's been several years since this thread left off, does anyone have experience with this?
     
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  15. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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  16. Ripcord22A

    Ripcord22A Site Benefactor

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    Apparently temple lodge 6 in albuquerque nm has that relationship with temple lodge 6 in Ireland

    Sent from my LG-H918 using My Freemasonry mobile app
     
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