Your Prediction: Freemasonry in 5-10 Years

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Blake Bowden, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    Re: An Idea

    There is no such thing as a "Scottish Rite Lodge". The Scottish Rite is organized into "Valleys", each individual chapter is called a "Valley". Once you are a Master Mason, you can petition the Scottish Rite at your local "Valley". If accepted, and you complete the 29 operative degrees of Scottish Rite Masonry, then you will be able to visit all Scottish Rite Valleys, worldwide.
     
  2. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    There is a slight trend toward younger brethren joining the lodges. My home lodge is growing through the 27-45 year age group. We have eight new masters in that group this year plus an additional five or six active in their degree work or petitioning at the moment.

    Once this demographic switch hits a lodge the change will be fast. Our group is already talking about bringing in friends they feel to be worthy. One thing that has surprised me is how strongly they believe in bringing in only quality members. I believe we are leaving the craft in good hands.

    Remember, the Viet Nam generation (my generation) was lost to masonry. They never became joiners and didn't begin to participate until the last 10 years or so.
     
  3. JohnnyFlotsam

    JohnnyFlotsam Premium Member

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    As usual, it depends...
    In certain areas, new (ie. "young") leadership has been allowed to make changes that have made Masonry relevant and meaningful. Witness the success of the traditional observance Lodges. These Lodges are expensive, exclusive, formal, challenging; everything that dying Lodges are not. To be fair, the occasional mainstream Lodge has pulled this off as well. They offer an experience that is meaningful, on many levels. They do not fret about "membership". They don't exist as a conduit to appendant bodies. They don't seem to worry about things like a candidate's skin color or religion. They do care about not just the ritual, but the intellectual, moral, and spiritual rigor that is supposed to be expected of a Mason as he learns to apply the lessons therein.

    Freemasonry, if it survives at all, is going to look a lot more like that in 10 years.
     
  4. streeter

    streeter Registered User

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    hello brother johnny flotsam,

    brilliant!
    it will survive -and survive well - if it adapts to a rapidly changing world [my mind] - and that is why i authored a book...
    unashamedly and without apology it can be discovered from my signature - do please takle a peep see!!

    blessings...

    robert streeter.
     
  5. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Brother, I can only HOPE SO! And, to tell you the truth ... your design is what masonry should always be.

    I have a funny take on the definition of NUMBERS. To me, numbers is directly proportional to the amount of true masons one has in a lodge. Anything else is just clutter.

    God speed brother. Loved your post!
     
  6. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Thank you again for the autographed first edition volume. I'm looking at that damn book hard. Can't decided whether to pass it down for a few of the worthy (only) brothers to read or to stuff it back in the box and place it back in the library. Now that is a selfish thought on my part!

    Well done! A book any learned mason must have to continue his progress to light.

    Maybe I'll just give them your website. Will that get me off the hook?

    :blink:
     
  7. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    If masonry, in ten years DOESN'T: put more emphasis on the philosophical teachings, have more in depth educational portions at the end of every meeting, rid itself of the factionalism and bias that plagues the GL's and it governance including the the absolute BS that's happening with our Prince Hall brothers, stress the need to know your work, and have LASTING lodge mentorship programs, then masonry will fade out into nonexistence. I could never imagine the day when I would have to put my apron away for good and never walk through the lodge room door again. I also agree on having more public exposure. I think along with the various charities and other activities freemasonry has its hands in, we should be sponsoring adult and little league baseball teams, hockey teams etc. provide support for rehab programs and strayed youths, hold food drives for the less fortunate. The list goes on. Good deeds go along way. They rub off on other people. And when someone sees you doing a good deed, and they find out your a mason, it will almost always make them think. We all have lives that make it difficult to give a lot more of our time to our fraternity, especially when providing for a family but just remember that your lodge needs you, your family needs you, your community needs you, your country needs you and Mother Earth needs you, just as you need all of them. Treat them with high regard and respect and they will do the same to you.
     
  8. QPZIL

    QPZIL Premium Member

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    It's a somewhat sad topic to think about. With Facebook and most peoples' social lives being mostly on the internet, it's hard to get them interested in a real-life fraternity. Luckily, our lodge has had a bit of a resurgence lately, but it's still hard to say what'll happen.


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  9. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    I was recently in lodges in another state so active doing degrees they had trouble keeping up. Yet they had at least one social, service or charity event per month without fail. Those events are part and parcel with the full candidate pipeline.

    The motto of the new young generation seems to be "life balance". They saw folks of the previous generation live as workaholics and want none of it. Where else to find life balance? Family, church, lodge. They're joining in droves at any lodge that greets them well and gets new members involved. Make a *point* of sitting with a new guy! He'll keep coming to lodge. Once the new generation has arrived, your lodge is no longer in danger of folding. Welcome them and learn what they want to discuss. Be the example they need, a stretch from being the example you want to be.

    Young fellows are also interested in the history, philosophy, mysticism. Stuff largely ignored in the last couple of generations. Learn about it and talk about it. Don't let the catechisms be "Masonic awareness". That's getting stuck on step one.

    And PHA, what's the deal with that? Both of my jurisdictions have have visitation in place for well over a decade. GL officers attend each others events. Group visitations are routine. I arrived in town and emailed the local PHA DDGM and learned there's no visitation. I felt like I'd landed in Siberia. To be blunt I have zero sympathy for whatever lame excuse either grand line is using. I just read recognition has been in place for 6 years (way late). It is ludicrous I can't visit. Start visitation *last year*, no excuses.

    On the GL level it's crazy all over the world. Grand line officers getting ejected in France and CT. Shrine recognition getting pulled in SC and other states. it's petty and does not set an example worthy of emulation.
     
  10. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Re: Your Prediction: Texas Freemasonry in 5-10 Years

    Well said! And that, my dear brother, is the only way these lodges are going to survive!
     
  11. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    Brother dfreybur,

    You are so right. I'm keeping our new bunch working their tails off! For the first time, our lodge is going to do two graded degrees this year. I'm stuffing new master masons in most of the positions. They are working hard and not making many mistakes. We've done it all this year and they've eaten up everything in their path. Eagerness and Energy are terrible things to waste.

    You know what? I'm even seeing a few older brothers stir around as if they are too alive.

    During this year in the East I'm going to make an old man out of myself once and for all: even if it kills me!

    :sneaky2:
     
  12. Blake Bowden

    Blake Bowden Administrator Staff Member

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    amen amen amen!
     
  13. THurse

    THurse Premium Member

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    There ar many different ideas of growth, but
    if membership is this low, I cannot find exact
    membership, loss or gain and I have searched
    endlessly for this information.
     
  14. jwhoff

    jwhoff Premium Member

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    This quote of oneself may be a first on these boards! Dunn't know for sure.

    However, Brother streeter, I passed on the website on and, behold, the brother went for the book last week. Make sure you sign his copy too.

    God speed.
     
  15. streeter

    streeter Registered User

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    oh my! I had no idea this conversation was still ongoing - I try to pop in and pop out of this site every day on my way to the gym and pool - but sometimes I miss out! so glad you are finding the work interesting- I could only afford to print 500 copies and when they are gone - well - that will be that - I suppose... and I have had some truly wonderful and inspiring comments - I am waiting for the english fellows to go nuts when they read chapter four ! ! oh lord God almighty - is there no help - eh?? very big grin... robert streeter
     
  16. crono782

    crono782 Premium Member

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    Came across this quote and thought it appropriate:

    "The chief obstacles to [Masonry's] success are the apathy and faithlessness of her own selfish children, and the supine indifference of the world. In the roar and crush and hurry of life and business, and the tumult and uproar of politics, the quiet voice of Masonry is unheard and unheeded."

    -Morals and Dogma



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    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
  17. Michael Hatley

    Michael Hatley Premium Member

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    I think you are going to see Gen X show up in force over the next 10 years. Our generation is right at half the size of both the Boomers and Gen Y though, keep that in mind.

    We've got about 15 years to prepare, plan and set the foundation for a very real potential renaissance. That being when the median Gen Y age is around 40 and their kiddos are about grown. Gen Y is a very large generation, twice the size of Gen X. And a whole lot less cynical all the way around than Gen X is.

    Fertile ground, brethren, fertile ground.
     
  18. Vitriol Knight

    Vitriol Knight Registered User

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    Brothers; What is a lodge?




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  19. jjjjjggggg

    jjjjjggggg Premium Member

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    My prediction is that we will really begin to take off when the old ideas of what freemasonry should be (a civic organization that should place little emphasis on the esoteric part of freemasonry, as I can see in much of the older crowd) gives way to the younger more open-minded men who hold ideals much more in line with the ideals of the Enlightenment. I think this will translate to more isolated lodges dying off and more urban lodges growing, since in urban areas people tend to be more open and tolerant.
     
  20. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    I'm finding that the older guys are opening up to the more esoteric aspects of the craft that usually get overlooked.


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