Bait & Switch, I Quit

Discussion in 'Masonic Blogs' started by Squire Bentley, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. Squire Bentley

    Squire Bentley Premium Member

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    Here is another article that follows on the heels of Brother Salman Sheika's article on "Why I Left Freemasonry." Perhaps in totally different experiences we can find some common themes here. And perhaps we can make our Lodges better Lodges. In the interest of Masonic improvement I offer you:

    http://freemasoninformation.com/2018/11/bait-switch-i-quit/


    Brother Frederic L. Milliken
     
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  2. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    Freemasonry is supposed to be a science. Science involves observation, hypothesis and experiment dealing with the hidden mysteries of nature and science.

    The problem is that the brethren have not undertaken the work of the FC. In 35 years I have met only one brother that actually put effort into the work of the FC. Little surprise then that I have never found any brother that understood the work of the MM - operation of the temple that extends from E to W and N to S and from the center of the Earth to the Heavens.
     
  3. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    We need to tell the young guys someone about how and why it's on them to make the value they seek. It's part teaching masculine initiative. It's part that the best teacher is the one inside. It's part not expecting stuff on a silver platter. This cluster is one more example of the type of secrets we could shout from the roof top and it still remains secret.
     
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  4. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    >need to tell the young guys

    I have taught hundreds of people, in workshops and individually, how to access the hidden mysteries of nature and science, but less than 10 practiced for more than a few weeks what they had learned.

    I suspect that humans that apply themselves to spiritual science have largely been reborn in other worlds. Those here now are often content to await the rising tide that lifts all boats.
     
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  5. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    IDK, maybe so, but committing that much time in this life can be very daunting for those of us in reality.
     
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  6. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    >committing that much time in this life can be very daunting for those of us in reality.

    Red pill or blue pill?
     
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  7. Rifleman1776

    Rifleman1776 Registered User

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    Very long dissertation that ended up saying nothing. He is free to do as he wishes. If the Masonic experience has little to no meaning to him then he should leave. The lead-in article said annual dues should be $500.00. I doubt that more than two members of my Lodge could afford that. We are about $30.00 and several members have to ask for temporary deferment to make that payment.
     
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  8. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    I think raising them is probably risky business, especially raising them ten fold but I must say, if they do raise them like that, the building better be looking pristine inside and out, no more Little Caesar's on paper plates and a Victorian Age vibe.
     
  9. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    >annual dues should be $500.00.

    It rather depends upon what the brethren wish Masonry to be. (The GAOTU is rarely consulted on such matters)

    A few years ago I was watching a Grand Lodge ritual team preparing to enter our lodge and it became obvious to me that the GL team had had past lives together in monasteries. So here they were back with their friends doing ritual and eating together just like the old days. It was quite irrelevant that the host organization was Freemasonry.

    A society for ritual and eating need not have high dues.

    In modern society there are men that like power and the company of powerful men. A society set up by such men would have high dues to demonstrate their wealth and to keep out those without influence.

    It is possible, although in 35 years I have only met two brethren interested, to have a society dedicated to the practice of Masonic Science. There, entry would be by recommendation of well respected practitioners, and dues might well be voluntary. One of the major objects of Masonic Science is management and operation of the temple that extends from E to W and N to S and from the center of the Earth to the Heavens.
     
  10. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    In the 17th century quite a few Freemasons were active in this, including those practicing celestial farming (alchemy)
     
  11. Winter

    Winter Premium Member

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    The TO Lodge I belong to took the plunge with having dues that were much higher than the other Lodges in our GL. The higher price for initiation and dues means it is a serious consideration for a prospective brother. While there have been arguments that it is elitist to exclude someone who cannot afford the dues, at the end of the day, the Masonic experience has value and we should not be ashamed to put that price tag on it.

    Along with that was an enforced dress code (dark suit and tie, officers must wear tuxedos), required attendance (Secretary must be contacted reason if unable to make the meeting), limited membership (max of 50 members of the Lodge), and a more involved experience with every meeting having a festive board. Most definitely not Little Caesars! Rather than trying to maintain an aging building, we opted to make an arrangement with a local private club to take over one of the floors twice a month for out meetings. All of our Lodge furniture is kept in a box, we set up one of the rooms on the floor as the lodge room, have our meeting, and then retire to the dining room for a meal prepared by the club. We don't have to worry about building maintenance or preparing the meal or cleaning up so every Brother can participate in the meeting. Including EAs since we meet on the 1st degree unless conferring a higher degree.
     
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  12. Brother JC

    Brother JC Vigilant Staff Member

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    There is a similar lodge near here, meets in a private club, hand-crafted officer’s aprons, higher dues... and an Initiation fee of $1,000.00.
     
  13. David612

    David612 Registered User

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    The cost of dues should be enough to have the lodge financially viable going forward- if the brethren want to eat crap food off paper plates in a rundown old building that’s fine, if they want to eat only the finest in their gold lodge building that’s fine too-
    We are $400 per year plus dining fees every meeting-
     
  14. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    This is sort of how most young Masons thought it'd be and hopefully will become one day. If you don't mind me asking, how much are your dues for a 50 person lodge and that great experience like that?
     
  15. Winter

    Winter Premium Member

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    Annual dues are $200 a year. Not as much as some TO Lodges have raised dues cost. But it is enough that joining is, or should be, a serious consideration. In addition, you have to pay for your meal and drinks at each meeting, which isn't too over the top and is usually anywhere between $20 and $40 depending on what you order. Also nice, because we meet at a private club that has multiple bars throughout the building and not a Masonic building we can meet for a drink before lodge begins and then relax with a glass and cigars afterward having great discussions.
     
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  16. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    That sounds spot on and not much more than many BLs.
     
  17. Winter

    Winter Premium Member

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    It is orders higher than most of the Lodges in the state considerign that dues have been kept artificially low for decades as an attempt to retain members. And we know how that went. When you consider that we don't have to maintain a building and meet in a more traditional style using someone else's back room, that money goes directly to funding our Lodge, our scholarships, or whatever other programs the Lodge wants to do.
     
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  18. CLewey44

    CLewey44 Registered User

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    That's awesome for sure. I say the more invested (emotionally or financially) you are in something, the more serious you'll take it. I've heard a lot of people complain about typical blue lodge experiences but I've never once heard anyone complain about T.O. lodges. The only people that do complain about T.O. lodges are guys that aren't members of them.
     
    Winter likes this.
  19. Winter

    Winter Premium Member

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    The number one complaint about TO Lodges is that the increased cost is seen as exclusionary. And that argument does have a point. But what is the alternative? Make it free so everyone can participate?
     
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  20. Brother JC

    Brother JC Vigilant Staff Member

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    People complain about $300 a year dues but spend $1,500 a year on their global chain coffee, or several hundred a month on the gym they never attend. It’s an invalid argument.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2018
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