Do aThe third eye

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by bro jimmie, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Do a
    The third eye


    Maybe the pyramids are the epitome of the Stone Age?
     
  2. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Re: Do a
    The third eye


    The Bronze age in Egypt was roughly a millennium old when the oldest known step pyramid was built. Let's call them the epitome of the Bronze Age.

    If you try to build tall structures without extensive knowledge of geometry a pyramid is the highest stable structure easily figured out. And they last impressively long because of their size. Thus it is natural for any ancient culture that decided to build large structures to build at least one pyramid.

    Add extensive geometry but not calculus and you can make Gothic cathedrals. Add calculus and it's skyscrapers.
     
  3. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    That's the key. Knowing geometry. And this, they knew quite well. What impresses me is that they made chambers and corridors in the pyramids. Whether they were made as they were built, or carved once the structures were complete, the precision is amazing.
     
  4. Michael Neumann

    Michael Neumann Premium Member

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    The Sphinx faces quite exactly the Leo constillation and the rising sun as it was over 10K years ago, here is a book on it http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0517888521/onlinebizhelp-20

    Further more the mathematical equations upon which the Sphinx and pyramids were constructed were quite advanced. Then you must consider the small openings built into the structure that just happen to align with stars specific to rituals, all this might be a big coincidence though according to http://www.math.washington.edu/~greenber/PiPyr.html which is a great paper on the chances of arriving at exactly pi.

    The stones were squared with such exactness that

    "Amazingly, the outside surface stones are cut within 0.01 (1/100th) inch of
    perfectly straight and at nearly perfect right angles for all six sides. And
    they were placed together with an intentional gap between them of 0.02 inch.
    Modern technology cannot place such 20-ton stones with greater accuracy than
    those in the Pyramid.
    Even more amazing is that the 0.02-inch gap was designed to allow space for
    glue to seal and hold the stones together. A white cement that connected the
    casing stones and made them watertight is still intact and stronger than the
    blocks that it joins."http://www.europa.com/~edge/pyramid.html

    "The average height of land above sea level (Miami being low and the
    Himalayas being high), as can be measured only by modern-day satellites and
    computers, happens to be 5,449 inches. That is the exact height of the Pyramid.

    All four sides of the Pyramid are very slightly and evenly bowed in, or
    concave. This effect, which cannot be detected by looking at the Pyramid from
    the ground, was discovered around 1940 by a pilot taking aerial photos to check
    certain measurements. As measured by today's laser instruments, all of these
    perfectly cut and intentionally bowed stone blocks duplicate exactly the
    curvature of the earth. The radius of this bow is equal to the radius of the
    Earth. This radius of curvature is what Newton had long been seeking."

    With all of that quoted I have to post one last link in regards to this and I will make leave for anyone else to comment. There are questions that we will be asking for years in regards to these amazing structures, perhaps we will one day have the truth but even then it will be disputed. When you seek knowledge you have to confirm your sources and then confirm the validity of their statements, several articles I quoted have inaccurate measurements, yet they were close enough that if fact checked they would still support my side of the debate. Fact checking is VERY important, that is why I like Bro.Bryan, he digs into your arguement and fact checks you... better square yourself before you approach him.In instances such as seen in this link- http://www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/shaheen.htm people can get carried away with making a point and attribute their opinion to someone else whose career might be impacted. Back up your statements with verifiable data, or just debate for the sake of debate like I do on occasion :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  5. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    Great point and I agree bro. Neumann. One thing I think most people can can agree on is that these structure have stood the test of time. Even the mainstream notion that they were (correct me if I'm wrong) built around 5000BC(?) that is still quite an impressive length of time. Not much has survived nature or the human hand from that era, mostly ruins, and artifacts.
     
  6. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    So? People today are not much different from people back then when it comes to carefully watching if they feel like it. My father-in-law can eyeball a project with almost as much precision as he can measure it. It's a matter of experience and know-how.

    No. They were carefully applied but not "quite advanced" if taken in the full context of mathematics. There were no differential equations needed, for example.

    Because people without electronic computers can't build a compass, squares, and pendulum? These tools are ancient, and they can be used with amazing precision if you know how. As for the precision of the masonry, if you've got a lot of workers, a lot of time (you're building for your god, after all), a lot of will, and tools so primitive that any mistakes will probably be very tiny, precision is not that surprising. Why do people insist upon discounting basic human ability in favor of boojum?

    I'd like to see that claim verified by a primary source--it's suspiciously specific.

    And Greek and Roman columns slightly bow, as well. So we should presume that every single Greek and Roman building was built for some kind of "mystical" ritual and not any other more pedestrian purpose? Victorian and more modern columns bow, too.

    Again, given that the source is just a web site, I would like to see where the actual measurements were published. This begins to sound like claims made for various quack nostrums my mother-in-law likes to buy.
     
  7. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    YouTube "secret construction of the pyramids"don't let the name fool you, theres nothing mystical or any kind conspiracy attached to it. It just puts forth all the data accumulated over the years. Also check out "ancient aliens debunked." Another non conspiracy video, just data.
     
  8. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    I don't do videos, I do books and papers. I have never much liked listening to lectures when I was a full-time student and don't do it in my free time. Drives people at work nuts. I get told that I don't need to worry about some aspect of my job until the university gets around to holding a "class" on it. Usually within a week, I'm doing that aspect of my job, learned from appropriate manuals. If there's no mandatory certification to go along with it, lectures merely waste my time. If I can learn to chromatin immune precipitation and multivariate statistics from start to finish from reading (only sat in on a class for the latter when it became necessary to "prove" I was "trained" in it--heard nothing I didn't already know), why not anything else?

    I also distrust videos. With written materials, I can stop, reverse, fact-check, all at my leisure with no inconvenience. Videos just run you along the path, no sidetracking from what the producer wants you to see and hear. Videos and canned presentations are the lowest form of pedagogy--stricly one-way, for passive consumption.
     
  9. widows son

    widows son Premium Member

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    So you making as assumption even though you never watch one second of either of them? The AA debunked actually cites every bit of material on there and is linked back to the producers website. For example he will be talking about some monument in S. America, and as he is saying a number will pop up corresponding to the specific citing on his web page. This is so as to make it easy to double check what he's saying, as you pause and jump to his page. As for the other video, there isn't a site to jump to to see any cites, but I believe BBC had a hand in its production. Bryan, just because some decides not to waste paper and provide an easier mode of communication, doesn't make it any less credible than coming from an essay that 30 pages long. Also are you saying every movie or documentary is a waste of time? David Attenborough might think otherwise. Many wise people have said to never judge a book by its cover.
     
  10. Bro. Stewart P.M.

    Bro. Stewart P.M. Lead Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    I have that tattoo on my left chest... and an ankh on my right
     
  11. Godfrey Daniel

    Godfrey Daniel Registered User

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    vivid imaginations
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  12. Brother JC

    Brother JC Vigilant Staff Member

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    And I have an apron with it on the flap...
     
  13. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Why should the sacred writings of one faith mention the deities of another faith? That's not good advertizing policy. Horus may appear in the Book of the Dead but there's no way he should appear in the Old Testament.
     
  14. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    I distrust the spoken word. Demagogues rely upon mass rallies, radio, television, and video--they always have. The written word requires slowing down. It requires contemplation to even read. Video? It's set to the lowest denominator--for passive consumption, only. If it is worth making a video over, it is worth writing about, and the writing will be far easier to use in later research. If there is something to "pop up" in a video, it is something I have to pause, write down, etc. In the written word, it is already in a form most useful for further research.

    The spoken word is to sway the mob. It always has been.
     
  15. BryanMaloney

    BryanMaloney Premium Member

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    Calcification of the pineal gland may affect no more than half of adults, and widespread pineal calcification is associated with Alzheimer's disease. Its function is rather well-eludicated. It produces melatonin, among other hormones, and high pineal activity is associated with suppression of puberty. It also may modify effects of various "recreational" drugs. For the majority of people, it is active throughout their lives. It is no longer some mysterious "third eye" but is part of a normally functioning brain and endocrine system, throughout a person's life. There has been a lot of work on the pineal, including in my own field (Alzheimer's).
     
  16. Godfrey Daniel

    Godfrey Daniel Registered User

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    imbibing kykeon
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013
  17. Godfrey Daniel

    Godfrey Daniel Registered User

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    recipe for memory
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2013

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