FM a She?

Discussion in 'Frequently Asked Questions' started by Lowcarbjc, Jul 25, 2013.

  1. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

    1,750
    547
    113
    In the Biblical tradition, if there was a man that ought not to be named for theological or political reasons, the reference was to "a certain man", so that only those that understood the context could interpret the commentary.

    This practice comes into Freemasonry where the mother of HA cannot be named but turns from "a widow" (implicitly unknown) into "the widow", needing no other identification because of being so well known.

    It is common to consider the Widow as Isis, who having recovered the body of the slain Osiris, used artificial insemination to generate Horus, thus he was the son of the widow and with no living father at the time of conception. Horus later raises his father in some accounts.

    An unnamed widow appears in Luke, again in the context of a raising:

    12 Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow: and much people of the city was with her.
    13 And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said unto her, Weep not.
    14 And he came and touched the bier: and they that bare him stood still. And he said, Young man, I say unto thee, Arise.
    15 And he that was dead sat up, and began to speak.


    Of course if we prefer not to name the Widow, we could always claim that Freemasonry is the widow, so many brethren having died.
     
  2. hiram357

    hiram357 Registered User

    30
    24
    8
    Well, I remember seeing a reference in ritual to the effect that when Hiram died, the craft was his widow, being left without its Grand Master, but now I can't find it. More to follow....
     
  3. pointwithinacircle2

    pointwithinacircle2 Rapscallion Premium Member

    803
    843
    113
    Wow, when you put it like that I can see a lot of room for esoteric speculation. Thanks for sharing this.
     
  4. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

    1,750
    547
    113
    These days that would be a somewhat ambiguous statement.
     
  5. coachn

    coachn Coach John S. Nagy Premium Member

    2,120
    2,103
    133
    Mother_01.JPG
     
    Zack likes this.
  6. pointwithinacircle2

    pointwithinacircle2 Rapscallion Premium Member

    803
    843
    113
    I can not know because in the 15 years that I have been a Mason I have never heard the Lodge referred to as Mother. My question is can I possibly find out why?
     
  7. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

    1,750
    547
    113
    Or more correctly with only 2 GM remaining - KS and HKT.

    Thus the craft must have been polyandrous at that time.

    Or, is the identity of the Widow being concealed?
     
  8. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

    3,935
    2,394
    133
    The term "mother lodge" is very common when dealing with petitions for affiliation and demit requests.

    We are all brothers. We are all widow's sons. It adds up but the only gender reference I know of other than posts in this thread is the term "mother lodge".
     
  9. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

    4,410
    3,100
    133
    Yes, we use the term 'mother lodge' for the lodge that you were initiated in.
     
  10. Canadian Paul

    Canadian Paul Registered User

    183
    174
    43
    The term 'Mother Lodge' (meaning the lodge in which you were Initiated) is almost an official term in the GL of Scotland. It appears in the EA Obligation in the ritual used by my 'Mother Lodge'. Grand Lodge itself refers to the lodges under it as 'daughter lodges' in 'The Constitution and Laws'. My lodge would refer to other lodges in the area as 'sister lodges'. We refer to the Grand Lodge of Newfoundland and Labrador as our 'sister constitution' or 'sister jurisdiction'. The first lodge on the Roll of the GL of Scotland, Lodge Killwinning No. O, (yes 'zero!) is often referred to as 'Mother Killwinning' as at one time it chartered 'daughter lodges'. The custom of referring to freemasonry as somehow 'feminine' is very old indeed. As to WHY it is so - like a lot in freemasonry, it is just 'because it always has been'!
     

Share My Freemasonry