How did u all become freemasons?

Discussion in 'Your Masonic Story' started by zakattack666, Oct 22, 2013.

  1. tantbrandon

    tantbrandon Premium Member

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    After realizing that every person I knew whom I had a great deal of respect for we're masons, I realized I needed to find out if it was just coincidence. So I emailed the grand lodge and about two days later the lodge secretary called me and this began my journey into light.


    My Freemasonry HD
     
  2. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    In most of the world there are never any invitations. You don't list your geography so there might be invitations if you live in certain European countries.

    In the US showing up is the preferred way. In other countries you may need to arrange for an introduction before showing up.
     
  3. Jericho2013

    Jericho2013 Premium Member

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    The senior pastor of my church was a mason and I asked him about it and if I could join. He drove me around town to brother's homes and got me all of my signatures. The process went very quickly after that.
     
  4. KSigMason

    KSigMason Traveling Templar Site Benefactor

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    My path to Freemasonry went through war first. I first became interested in Freemasonry while I was getting ready to deploy to Iraq. I spent the entire tour reading up on Freemasonry and decided that I would join when I got home. One day, I went to the Grand Lodge and he told me there was a Lodge meeting that very night so I went there and had dinner. I enjoyed them so much I turned in my petition and fees then and there. I'm just passing 7.5-years and it's been one Hell of a ride!
     
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  5. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I became a Mason, for one simple reason. Men that I respected were Freemasons. So I called the lodge, and asked for a petition. I completed it, and submitted it.

    Most Masons do not realize that we are own best advertisement. When you put on your lodge ring, and advertise who you are, remember this.
     
  6. jmiluso

    jmiluso Registered User

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    Said very well Cema. SMIB
     
  7. Bro Darren

    Bro Darren Premium Member

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    My Mum's (mom's) uncle was a Freemason and was involved in the Scottish Rite - I was 14 around the time I found this out and I remember the stories he use to share or didn't share. I remember him as a gentleman and I respected him for the love he showed for Freemasonry and his Brothers.

    Its taken me 22 years but I joined and was initiated this year and in some strange way, even though he died some time ago, I feel a different connection to him :)
     
  8. CuAllaidh

    CuAllaidh Registered User

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    I first became interested in Freemasonry a number of years ago, went so far as to visit the local lodge, meet with a few members, but I didn't petition at the time, I was worried that fitting in would be difficult as every member I met was well over 80 yrs old and I (at the time) was in my late 20's. It didn't seem a fit. About a year ago I moved across country and ended up in a small town that I knew no one other than my fiance. On my first day I was asked if I was a mason or an elk, I was neither but it did let me know the masons were active in the area. I knew my boss (who was about my age) was a member, and so were several other co-workers. I asked a co-worker, I petitioned was investigated and finally initiated as an EA fairly recently.

    There was a significant delay between petitioning and initiation for two reasons, one the town I live in is a fairly conservative Christian town and on my petition page I was asked what religion I followed, I wrote Agnostic, this raised some concerns. The other reason for the delay is there is a summer break the lodge takes and I was voted in just before the break. The Agnostic issue was fairly easy to overcome as I simply had to explain my particular brand of agnosticism in that I believe in a deity, I was just unsure of what that diety was, that I followed no specific religion but follow my own moral code that I believe the GAOTU would approve of.

    2be1ask1
     
  9. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    You sound like a man who will make an excellent Freemason. I wish you every possible success.
     
  10. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    Once you have attended lodge you will discover that age isn't the hurdle you expect it to be. Masonry unites men of all walks of life including across generational boundaries.

    The petition on your jurisdiction asks which religion you're a member of? I was surprised to read that. In the jurisdictions I know that question is not on the form and is not supposed to be asked by the investigating committee.

    Agnostic was an unfortunate choice of word. In general usage it means you're undecided on the existence of deity. As you have since learned "not a member of any particular religion" describes your stance more accurately. On dog tags in the military that might be NO REL PREF. I was never comfortable with the word NONE on my original dog tags as I have never been either an atheist or agnostic even back when I was not a member of any particular religion. When I settled into my religion of choice I had new dog tags made even though I was no longer in the military.
     
  11. CuAllaidh

    CuAllaidh Registered User

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    This I have certainly discovered to be true, the age barrier just doesn't exist, I get along fine with the youngest and oldest members in my lodge equally well, the first time I looked into it I was younger and not quite comfortable with the idea of hanging around "old folks", the bias was my issue, not masonry's.

    Yes, but its not used to discriminate (in theory) just to ensure that they do believe in some form of religion.

    I use the term Agnostic in a more classical sense as the word actually originally meant the belief that the ultimate truth about god cannot be discovered by mortal man. It sprang from the humanism movement. While it has become known more as the fence sitters religion (those who neither believe nor disbelieve) there is a whole range of agnosticism. I spoke with various Mason members to discuss the wording of this and explained what agnostic meant for me before writing that answer and meeting the investigating committee. I felt strongly that the use of Agnostic to describe my faith works better than no particular religion, because around here that usually means Christian but not actively attending church.
     
  12. CuAllaidh

    CuAllaidh Registered User

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    Oh and I should note that the question asking the specific religion, I was told the question is completely voluntary, that I didn't NEED to answer it at all. I felt I should in my case because I did not want to misrepresent myself nor wedge into a group whose morality did not accept my own as valid.
     
  13. BWilliams122

    BWilliams122 Registered User

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    Just and duly constituted lodge! Duh lol
     
  14. Flatworlder

    Flatworlder Registered User

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    I was invited to go to dinner with a couple my wife knew at the time. Unknowingly the husband of my wifes friend was a the Worshipful Master of the Lodge in the small town. I was invited to go to his den and took notice of some of his books. One book stood out, The Hiram Key. we started to talk, and I began talking about my interest in Masonry. One thing lead to another and I asked the Questions. I wanted to be one... Again from my previous postings I found masonry a way for me to deal with losing my job with the airlines. I missed the feeling of brotherhood I had within the airlines which I worked for 23 years.
     
  15. Flatworlder

    Flatworlder Registered User

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    Contact your local Grand Lodge. they can point you in the right direction.
     
  16. coomby

    coomby Registered User

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    I had been doing contract work in a couple of lodges so I spoke to the WM of one of them and he put me through to my local lodge (happened to be someone that I knew for many years beforehand).


    Sent From My Freemasonry Pro App
     
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  17. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    I have known a number of Masons through the years and they all had something in common, they were all good and decent men. So I called a friend of more than 25 years who is a Mason and asked how to join. The rest is history.
     
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  18. anthonybeley

    anthonybeley Registered User

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    i came from a family of freemasons... my siblings and i are exposed at a young age how noble and good freemasons are
     
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  19. Peck1988

    Peck1988 Registered User

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    I contacted a local mason, met up number of times, went to a couple of social events and with my dad we were both initiated together
     
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  20. PennsylvaniaMason

    PennsylvaniaMason Registered User

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    I come from a family of Masons, and married into a family of masons. Freemasonry was always there in the background, I just didn't know it at the time.

    I asked a friend to recommend me, and waited with baited breath... turns out he had been behind on paying his dues and was avoiding contact with his own lodge. After waiting for months on end (6 months to be exact) I approached a family member. He gave me some of the best advice I could have ever reached. Per his suggestion, I went online, found a lodge nearby and sent the Secretary an email. After reaching out to the lodge, I found out when their meetings were and if there was a dinner before the meeting. Per my Uncle's suggestion, I attended a dinner and met some of the members and talked freely about joining, after a nice meal and fellowship a gentleman approached me with a blank petition.

    I eagerly filled it out on the spot and wrote a check for the initiation fee, I watched two gentlemen sign my petition and with a warm handshake sent me on my way. These men would later become my mentors and closest friends. I am forever indebted to these men and my late Uncle for their inspiration and guidance.
     
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