Masonic Law concerning petitioners who are felons.

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Jim Rohrman, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Cody Buck

    Cody Buck Registered User

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    Thank you for your time gentlemen.
     
  2. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    Did you commit the crime ?
    Rules vary from place to place, and sometimes Grand Masters have the power to set them aside. I recently arranged for a man to become a Freemason who has been convicted of stealing a boat on a trailor. Friends had taken it and put it in his parents yards and he refused to name who did it, so was charged and convicted - but 30 years ago as a 19 year old and since he seems to have lived an exemplary life. He has not been balloted, but the GM has given his consent for him to proceed.

    Many Nth Americans often present a very black and white view on this - but I often wonder if that is truly the case. I know a man I know who has actually been in jail for stealing cars as a 18 year old. He was poor and dumb. He is now over 60, two grown children, a grandchild and works tirelessly to look after his family in a low paid shift job, and I would stake my masonic honour and membership on him. He would be a great Freemason. Only problem is, he is too busy looking after others and hence feels he does not have time for lodge. I think I would be able to get him in fully complying with our Law, Customs and Constitution. He has volunteers with Lodge several times, simply to help me, and several people have spotted his merit. I have known him since I was 15 and he has always been a good role model for me.

    I would say the circumstances of your conviction, the crime and your current life would have great bearing if you were in my jurisdiction, I would be looking for a pattern of merit since your youth.

    Assuming you are a good man, (and with no disrespect, that might be a big assumption), I would recommend trying to find an advocate in the place you wish to you join.

    And despite all the above, I have blocked men (not blackballed them, but certainly blocked them) because I thought they were of low or unreliable character. Freemasonry is not for everyone, but I do have the view that it is better to miss out on worthy members than admit unworthy ones.
     
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  3. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Agreed.
     
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  4. Cody Buck

    Cody Buck Registered User

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    I've decided not to petition for new membership but thank you so much for your time.
     
  5. Bloke

    Bloke Premium Member

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    I wish you luck Cody. Freemasonry is just one of many paths to be a better man, regardless of the path you walk to get there, being a better man is always a worthy goal.
     
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  6. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Well said Brother Bloke!
     
  7. rpbrown

    rpbrown Premium Member

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    Just to throw this out there, a member of our lodge was convicted of a felony a long time ago (60's). His crime was a single marijuana "joint" in his car. The judge decided to make an example out of him and gave him the maximum sentence (10 years I think). He got out on parole in 2 years. He has led an exemplary life since, in fact has become a pastor of a church. Under the old GLoT law, he would not have been admitted. However, since that law changed and left it to the discretion of the lodge, he was admitted. He was honest with the investigative committee of which I was a member and that held a lot of weight with me. Besides that, his charge today would only be, I think, a class C misdemeanor which is a simple speeding ticket.
    It is for reasons like this that I believe it should be left up to the individual lodge.
     
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