Freemason Lodges in Prison ??

Discussion in 'General Freemasonry Discussion' started by Travelling Man91, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. MRichard

    MRichard Mark A. Ri'chard Premium Member

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    Yours must have been different from mine. What grand lodge are you from? [Jeopardy tune starts playing in the background]
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2015
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  2. Warrior1256

    Warrior1256 Site Benefactor

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    Agreed. I was a correctional officer for 29 years, working in 4 different institutions and I never heard of "prison" Masons.
     
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  3. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    Well my brother, first for everything
     
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  4. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Yes, as it is not based on a fact. Your obedience may not have rules on criminals, but every recognized jurisdiction of which I'm aware does. To find them excluded is a natural consequence. They can and should be loved as a humans.

    Tell us how you've reached out to a Prisoner lately
     
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  5. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    Really? There were others involved in mine. Are you confusing the two craft orders under which you claim you took obligations?
     
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  6. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    Just because you didn't hear about them doesn't mean they weren't there brother. The guy said there was wasn't much of them, but don't forget how many it takes to open a lodge of master masons.
     
  7. Bill Lins

    Bill Lins Moderating Staff Staff Member

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    I disagree entirely. The Brethren in the POW camp are all in good standing. None of those in prison are. A tremendous difference. Even if a Lodge was legally chartered in a prison for the benefit of inmates, my obligation precludes me from meeting with them, as they are not in good standing. No such restriction in a POW camp.

    If you are referring to meeting in a tiled Lodge, I know of no Grand Lodge that allows such without a legitimate charter (i.e. "permission of the Grand Lodge"). Otherwise, one can talk to one's Brethren at any time, anywhere without special dispensation except for certain specific instances.
     
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  8. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    Let me elaborate on why I chose "Freemason Lodges in Prison" as the subject. I do not believe any regular GL has gave permission to these guys to operate. The reason I say lodge in Prison is because the guy stated that he became a mason in a lodge in Prison.
     
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  9. MRichard

    MRichard Mark A. Ri'chard Premium Member

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    You are talking about clandestine masons. The rules don't apply to them. They make them up.
     
  10. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    I agree 100% brother, they are clandestine, which is why I didn't answer any questions, only asked questions to learn about this bogus masonry.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015
  11. Billy Cox

    Billy Cox Registered User

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    Yes, there maybe masons in prison. However, if you never sit in lodge with them then be very careful. Many people in prison have a difficultly in following societies rules which govern the land.


    Sent From My Freemasonry Pro App
     
  12. JamestheJust

    JamestheJust Registered User

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    As an outsider I find interesting the assumption that every US citizen convicted is actually guilty. I would have thought that an African-American might take a different view.

    What view might the GAOTU take on improperly convicted brethren?
     
  13. Glen Cook

    Glen Cook G A Cook Site Benefactor

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    I didn't see that presumption. Rather, they have been convicted of a crime.

    Would your GL grant them a charter?
     
  14. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    Why would an African-American take a different view ? So just because a person is "African American" which I'm not a fan of calling people, should automatically be okay with clandestine masons, because ?? You want to know the truth about it, I was going to leave race out of it, but the guy that told me this was white.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015
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  15. Brother_Steve

    Brother_Steve Premium Member

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    Jurisprudence of Law has nothing to do with guilty or not guilty.

    Are you a mason? I would refresh yourself with the symbols of the third degree concerning the GAOTU namely the ASE.
     
  16. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I have never heard of a working lodge in a prison. BUT, I shared a hospital room with a man who had "done time", and he told me of his masonic experiences in prison. He met a 33rd degree Mason who was in the joint. Many of the guards were masons, but he asked for no special privileges, and did not expect any.

    He also gave me some advice on what to if ever I was incarcerated. (for instructional purposes only). He was a fascinating man, and quite intellgent. He could have really made a life for himself, if had made some better choices in his early life.
     
  17. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    I don't believe they are a regular working lodge, but anyone can gather a group of men together and meet and call themselves a lodge of anything
     
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  18. cemab4y

    cemab4y Premium Member

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    I have never heard of a working lodge in a prison. BUT, I shared a hospital room with a man who had "done time", and he told me of his masonic experiences in prison. He met a 33rd degree Mason who was in the joint. Many of the guards were masons, but he asked for no special privileges, and did not expect any.

    He also gave me some advice on what to if ever I was incarcerated. (for instructional purposes only). He was a fascinating man, and quite intellgent. He could have really made a life for himself, if had made some better choices in his early life.
     
  19. dfreybur

    dfreybur Premium Member

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    On concentration camps - It is important that all such meetings involved members of regular jurisdictions. In theory at the time they did not have permission but they had not way to make contact so they did their best. What is the lynch pin to me is that once their history was discovered after the war was over they were hailed as heroes. If they had been able to ask permission it is clear they would have been granted permission.

    On prisons - The story is different at both levels. All regular jurisdictions expel on conviction so prisons in jail are at most expelled former members. And it is certain that no regular jurisdiction would grant permission for a lodge behind bars to make Masons.

    There has been mention of convicted brothers. Some jurisdictions exclude those with felony records from petitioning. Other jurisdictions allow petitioning as long as it's been long enough and the petitioner is open about it. In those jurisdictions some lodges don't accept those with records. So while it's possible to have a brother with a record it remains rare and only after he is long out before petitioning. There's also the possibility of reinstatement. That only happens long after a brother is out and it requires a vote at grand lodge. I've seen men turned down just because it hasn't been long enough.

    Taken together I think it unlikely there was a quorum to confer even a clandestine degree.

    What I think happened is a convict found a ritual book and read it. He committed enough to memory to be able to talk the talk. Maybe he did it hoping for better treatment from the guards.
     
  20. Travelling Man91

    Travelling Man91 Registered User

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    I could see that. But I could also see a former mason being convicted of a felony and sentenced to life and not won't to let go of the craft, so they continue to practice masonry in prison. Just a theory. The guy stated that the guys that raised him were former regular masons. I don't know brother. I just thought it was an interesting conversation and wanted to share what I had learned.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2015

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